Exploring the relationships among RAN, linguistic/cognitive variables and early reading skills in first- and second-grade students

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280462
Title:
Exploring the relationships among RAN, linguistic/cognitive variables and early reading skills in first- and second-grade students
Author:
Babur, Fatma Nalan
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The main purpose of the study was to examine the relationship of Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) to cognitive, linguistic, and basic reading skills (word/nonword reading). Concurrent relationships among RAN, Phonological Awareness (PA), Verbal Short-Term Memory (STM), Processing Speed (PS), Letter Knowledge (LK) and Early Reading Skills (READ) were examined in 133 first- and second-grade children. The sample consisted of students who demonstrated a variety of reading skills. Causal models of RAN and Basic Reading skills were developed. The proposed direct and indirect relationships among variables were examined and appropriateness of the path models was tested through path analyses. Path analyses revealed that RAN digits/letters (RAN-DL) and PA were important and independent predictors of READ at each grade level. The findings demonstrated that RAN-DL had an increasingly predictive role in READ, whereas the importance of PA relatively diminished in the second grade. LK had a consistent predictive role in READ in both grades, whereas STM and PS had changing direct and indirect roles in READ in both grades. RAN objects (RAN-OBJ) had no significant role in READ at either grade level. Results indicated that STM and LK made significant contributions to RAN-DL and RAN-OBJ in the first grade; however, PS explained significant variance in only RAN-OBJ. PA did not explain any significant variance in RAN-DL and RAN-OBJ at either grade level. Interestingly, none of these four variables contributed to RAN-DL and RAN-OBJ in the second grade.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Elementary.; Education, Reading.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mather, Nancy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExploring the relationships among RAN, linguistic/cognitive variables and early reading skills in first- and second-grade studentsen_US
dc.creatorBabur, Fatma Nalanen_US
dc.contributor.authorBabur, Fatma Nalanen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe main purpose of the study was to examine the relationship of Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) to cognitive, linguistic, and basic reading skills (word/nonword reading). Concurrent relationships among RAN, Phonological Awareness (PA), Verbal Short-Term Memory (STM), Processing Speed (PS), Letter Knowledge (LK) and Early Reading Skills (READ) were examined in 133 first- and second-grade children. The sample consisted of students who demonstrated a variety of reading skills. Causal models of RAN and Basic Reading skills were developed. The proposed direct and indirect relationships among variables were examined and appropriateness of the path models was tested through path analyses. Path analyses revealed that RAN digits/letters (RAN-DL) and PA were important and independent predictors of READ at each grade level. The findings demonstrated that RAN-DL had an increasingly predictive role in READ, whereas the importance of PA relatively diminished in the second grade. LK had a consistent predictive role in READ in both grades, whereas STM and PS had changing direct and indirect roles in READ in both grades. RAN objects (RAN-OBJ) had no significant role in READ at either grade level. Results indicated that STM and LK made significant contributions to RAN-DL and RAN-OBJ in the first grade; however, PS explained significant variance in only RAN-OBJ. PA did not explain any significant variance in RAN-DL and RAN-OBJ at either grade level. Interestingly, none of these four variables contributed to RAN-DL and RAN-OBJ in the second grade.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Reading.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMather, Nancyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3119931en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b45625232en_US
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