How college affects students: Toward the reconciliation of theory with empirical evidence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280460
Title:
How college affects students: Toward the reconciliation of theory with empirical evidence
Author:
Zhang, Liang
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous research has generally shown a very small although statistically significant economic benefit from attending high-quality colleges. This small effect was at odds with what students' college choices and various social theories would seem to suggest. This study sought to reconcile the empirical evidence and theories. The effort was in two directions. First, the economic effect of college quality was reexamined--not only for an "average" student, but also for different students. Second, the effect of college quality was expanded from examining only the economic benefit to considering other student outcomes, including job satisfaction and graduate degree accomplishment. A new perspective regarding the social role of college quality was offered in conclusion.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Economics, Labor.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Leslie, Larry L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHow college affects students: Toward the reconciliation of theory with empirical evidenceen_US
dc.creatorZhang, Liangen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Liangen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has generally shown a very small although statistically significant economic benefit from attending high-quality colleges. This small effect was at odds with what students' college choices and various social theories would seem to suggest. This study sought to reconcile the empirical evidence and theories. The effort was in two directions. First, the economic effect of college quality was reexamined--not only for an "average" student, but also for different students. Second, the effect of college quality was expanded from examining only the economic benefit to considering other student outcomes, including job satisfaction and graduate degree accomplishment. A new perspective regarding the social role of college quality was offered in conclusion.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Labor.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLeslie, Larry L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3108970en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44844578en_US
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