Both sword and shield: The strategic use of customary law in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280452
Title:
Both sword and shield: The strategic use of customary law in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
Author:
Robbins, Helen A. R.
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is based on ethno-historic fieldwork in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). In the CNMI there is a complex interaction of customary law within the framework of an American legal system. By studying land disputes in a historical context, I examine how custom is represented, reconfigured, and constructed through law and the dispute process. Law reflects and reproduces ideology through its relationship with the state while at the local level of the case one can analyze the specific ways individuals access, affect, and are affected by the legal system. Courts are a site for the production of meanings that includes state-level forces, such as the law and procedural rules, as well as the impact of individuals, such as attorneys, litigants, and witnesses.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Law.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Philips, Susan U.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBoth sword and shield: The strategic use of customary law in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islandsen_US
dc.creatorRobbins, Helen A. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Helen A. R.en_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is based on ethno-historic fieldwork in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). In the CNMI there is a complex interaction of customary law within the framework of an American legal system. By studying land disputes in a historical context, I examine how custom is represented, reconfigured, and constructed through law and the dispute process. Law reflects and reproduces ideology through its relationship with the state while at the local level of the case one can analyze the specific ways individuals access, affect, and are affected by the legal system. Courts are a site for the production of meanings that includes state-level forces, such as the law and procedural rules, as well as the impact of individuals, such as attorneys, litigants, and witnesses.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectLaw.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPhilips, Susan U.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010250en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41711440en_US
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