Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280435
Title:
Young adult sexual styles: Links to concepts of self and others
Author:
McGuire, Jenifer Kristine
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Sexual identity is examined in terms of three distinct parts: sexual style, self-concept in relational and sexual domains, and concepts of relationships and partners. Sexual style, the first component of sexual identity in this study, is defined operationally to include numerous features of sexual behavior and attitudes about behavior. Self-concept in relational and sexual domains is the second component of sexual identity and includes beliefs about the self in relationships, desire for relationships, personal marriage expectations and gender role beliefs. Concepts of relationships and partners, the third component of sexual identity, includes features of dating relationships in general, beliefs about dating, experience of communication and violence in relationships, and for people in relationships, specific characteristics of the relationship. The data for this project were taken from Wave 7 (age 20-21) of the Michigan Study of Adolescent Life Transitions (MSALT). Part one of the study utilized hierarchical cluster analysis with split halves of females and males to group individuals into different sexual style clusters. Clusters were based on the measured variables: Usual frequency of intercourse, importance of regularly having sex, satisfaction with sex life, experience of coercion for sex, and sexual risk reduction. For females, the following five-cluster solution best represented the sample: Satisfied, Moderate, Active Unprotected, Pressured and Comfortably Inactive. For males, the following six-cluster solution best represented the sample: Satisfied, Dissatisfied, Moderate, Active Unprotected, Pressured and Comfortably Inactive. The model to predict sexual style was based on a model of sexual identity, and used multivariate logistic regression to estimate the probability of cluster membership given a certain level of each predictor variable, holding constant the other predictor variables. Using the model of sexual identity, it was possible to correctly classify between 35--47% of the females and males into the correct sexual style.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family Studies and Human Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barber, Bonnie L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleYoung adult sexual styles: Links to concepts of self and othersen_US
dc.creatorMcGuire, Jenifer Kristineen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Jenifer Kristineen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSexual identity is examined in terms of three distinct parts: sexual style, self-concept in relational and sexual domains, and concepts of relationships and partners. Sexual style, the first component of sexual identity in this study, is defined operationally to include numerous features of sexual behavior and attitudes about behavior. Self-concept in relational and sexual domains is the second component of sexual identity and includes beliefs about the self in relationships, desire for relationships, personal marriage expectations and gender role beliefs. Concepts of relationships and partners, the third component of sexual identity, includes features of dating relationships in general, beliefs about dating, experience of communication and violence in relationships, and for people in relationships, specific characteristics of the relationship. The data for this project were taken from Wave 7 (age 20-21) of the Michigan Study of Adolescent Life Transitions (MSALT). Part one of the study utilized hierarchical cluster analysis with split halves of females and males to group individuals into different sexual style clusters. Clusters were based on the measured variables: Usual frequency of intercourse, importance of regularly having sex, satisfaction with sex life, experience of coercion for sex, and sexual risk reduction. For females, the following five-cluster solution best represented the sample: Satisfied, Moderate, Active Unprotected, Pressured and Comfortably Inactive. For males, the following six-cluster solution best represented the sample: Satisfied, Dissatisfied, Moderate, Active Unprotected, Pressured and Comfortably Inactive. The model to predict sexual style was based on a model of sexual identity, and used multivariate logistic regression to estimate the probability of cluster membership given a certain level of each predictor variable, holding constant the other predictor variables. Using the model of sexual identity, it was possible to correctly classify between 35--47% of the females and males into the correct sexual style.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily Studies and Human Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarber, Bonnie L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3108932en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44829917en_US
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