Persuasion, pitch and presentation: The effects of information style on individual decision making

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280416
Title:
Persuasion, pitch and presentation: The effects of information style on individual decision making
Author:
Higgins, Margaret Anne
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The four experiments examined five issues relating to the use of information by decision makers. The first was time; second was descriptive words instead of university letter grades; third was the information source's credibility; fourth was persuasion technique; and fifth was type of appeal. Time available was variously combined with letter grades, evaluative words, and differentially credible information sources. The first two experiments showed that time and evaluative words affect decisions, and that evaluative words were more effective when time was short. The third experiment showed that credible sources strongly influence a decision, but, when time is short, the effect of a credible source weakens. The fourth experiment aimed to ascertain if one appeal type was more effective than another when used in conjunction with one of two persuasion techniques. Modified versions of the persuasion techniques Foot In The Door (FITD), and Door In The Face (DITF), were crossed with two types of appeal common to public television, Mission and Transaction. Mission appeals discuss quality; Transaction appeals offer a return. The FITD and the DITF manipulated the magnitude of the initial donation request, with subjects then responding to either a Mission or a Transaction appeal. There were no significant effects for pitch, or for persuasion technique. Significant interactions between pitch and sex, and pitch, persuasion, and sex were found. Males gave most when Transaction pitches were used with the DITF and least to Mission appeals with the DITF. Females by contrast responded most to Mission pitches used with the DITF persuasion technique. The results of experiment four have practical implications for public broadcasting fundraising.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mass Communications.; Information Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harwood, Jake

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePersuasion, pitch and presentation: The effects of information style on individual decision makingen_US
dc.creatorHiggins, Margaret Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Margaret Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe four experiments examined five issues relating to the use of information by decision makers. The first was time; second was descriptive words instead of university letter grades; third was the information source's credibility; fourth was persuasion technique; and fifth was type of appeal. Time available was variously combined with letter grades, evaluative words, and differentially credible information sources. The first two experiments showed that time and evaluative words affect decisions, and that evaluative words were more effective when time was short. The third experiment showed that credible sources strongly influence a decision, but, when time is short, the effect of a credible source weakens. The fourth experiment aimed to ascertain if one appeal type was more effective than another when used in conjunction with one of two persuasion techniques. Modified versions of the persuasion techniques Foot In The Door (FITD), and Door In The Face (DITF), were crossed with two types of appeal common to public television, Mission and Transaction. Mission appeals discuss quality; Transaction appeals offer a return. The FITD and the DITF manipulated the magnitude of the initial donation request, with subjects then responding to either a Mission or a Transaction appeal. There were no significant effects for pitch, or for persuasion technique. Significant interactions between pitch and sex, and pitch, persuasion, and sex were found. Males gave most when Transaction pitches were used with the DITF and least to Mission appeals with the DITF. Females by contrast responded most to Mission pitches used with the DITF persuasion technique. The results of experiment four have practical implications for public broadcasting fundraising.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
dc.subjectInformation Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHarwood, Jakeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3108908en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44825341en_US
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