Death of the celluloid maiden: Images of Native American women in film

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280367
Title:
Death of the celluloid maiden: Images of Native American women in film
Author:
Marubbio, Miriam
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Death of the Celluloid Maiden: Images of Native American Women in Film traces and analyses the representation of Native American women in the history of American film. In particular, the work focuses on the figure of a young Native woman who falls in love with, aids, or otherwise is connected to the white hero and dies for that choice. I have labeled this representation the Celluloid Maiden trope. It contains two primary figures that I have termed the Celluloid Princess and the Sexualized Maiden. These figures inform each other from the 1910s through the 1960s and combine to form a hybrid character in the 1970s and 1990s. The trope emerges in conjunction with the myth of the Frontier and the white American Adam/hero figure as ambiguous references to inter-racial mixing and assimilation. While each generation of media maneuvers the trope to fit the political and social milieu of the period, it remains a solidly entrenched vehicle through which colonialism and racism are enacted on the body of the Native American woman. Within the Celluloid Maiden trope, native culture, sexuality, and race conflate into interchangeable identifiers of difference that participate in a larger discourse of nationalism, itself based on a hierarchy of race and gender. Thus, the Celluloid Maiden trope and its components are deeply tied to American identity politics and an ongoing re-establishment of a white, patriarchal system of power through its narratives of belonging, nation formation, colonization and racism. Death of the Celluloid Maiden's significance lies in its dedication to understanding the ways in which our culture utilizes racialized, gendered and sexualized bodies, especially female bodies, as sites for inscribing difference. The dissertation explores the complex web of power relations that exists in the cultural arena informing film images. In particular, I am concerned with how the historical and visually reproductive relationship between whites and Native Americans in general, which informs this particular image of Native American women specifically, creates intercultural boundaries that continually reinforce social, racial, and gendered difference.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Cinema.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Holm, Tom; White, Susan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDeath of the celluloid maiden: Images of Native American women in filmen_US
dc.creatorMarubbio, Miriamen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarubbio, Miriamen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDeath of the Celluloid Maiden: Images of Native American Women in Film traces and analyses the representation of Native American women in the history of American film. In particular, the work focuses on the figure of a young Native woman who falls in love with, aids, or otherwise is connected to the white hero and dies for that choice. I have labeled this representation the Celluloid Maiden trope. It contains two primary figures that I have termed the Celluloid Princess and the Sexualized Maiden. These figures inform each other from the 1910s through the 1960s and combine to form a hybrid character in the 1970s and 1990s. The trope emerges in conjunction with the myth of the Frontier and the white American Adam/hero figure as ambiguous references to inter-racial mixing and assimilation. While each generation of media maneuvers the trope to fit the political and social milieu of the period, it remains a solidly entrenched vehicle through which colonialism and racism are enacted on the body of the Native American woman. Within the Celluloid Maiden trope, native culture, sexuality, and race conflate into interchangeable identifiers of difference that participate in a larger discourse of nationalism, itself based on a hierarchy of race and gender. Thus, the Celluloid Maiden trope and its components are deeply tied to American identity politics and an ongoing re-establishment of a white, patriarchal system of power through its narratives of belonging, nation formation, colonization and racism. Death of the Celluloid Maiden's significance lies in its dedication to understanding the ways in which our culture utilizes racialized, gendered and sexualized bodies, especially female bodies, as sites for inscribing difference. The dissertation explores the complex web of power relations that exists in the cultural arena informing film images. In particular, I am concerned with how the historical and visually reproductive relationship between whites and Native Americans in general, which informs this particular image of Native American women specifically, creates intercultural boundaries that continually reinforce social, racial, and gendered difference.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectCinema.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural and Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHolm, Tomen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWhite, Susanen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3107018en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44663419en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.