Application of the heat engine framework to modeling of large-scale atmospheric convection

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280339
Title:
Application of the heat engine framework to modeling of large-scale atmospheric convection
Author:
Adams, David Kenton
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The heat engine framework is examined in terms of large-scale atmospheric convection in order to investigate several theoretical and modeling issues related to the steady-state convecting atmosphere. Applications of the heat engine framework to convective circulations are reviewed. It is shown that this framework provides fundamental insights into the nature of various atmospheric phenomena and estimates of their potential intensity. The framework is shown to be valid for both reversible and irreversible systems; the irreversible processes' sole effect is to reduce the thermodynamic efficiency of the convective heat engine. The heat engine framework is then employed to demonstrate that the two asymptotic limits of quasi-equilibrium theory are consistent. That is, the fractional area covered by convection goes to zero, σ → 0, as the ratio of the convective adjustment to large-scale time scale (e.g. radiative time scale) go to zero, tADJ/tLS →0 , despite recent arguments to the contrary. Furthermore, the heat engine framework is utilized to develop a methodology for assessing the strength of irreversibilities in numerical models. Using the explicit energy budget, we derive thermodynamic efficiencies based on work and the heat budget for both open (e.g., the Hadley circulation) and closed (e.g., the general circulation) thermodynamic systems. In addition, the Carnot efficiency for closed systems is calculated to ascertain the maximum efficiency possible. Comparison of the work-based efficiency with that of the efficiency based on the heat budget provides a gauge for assessing how close to reversible model-generated circulations are. A battery of experiments is carried out with an idealized GCM. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated and it is shown that an essentially reversible GCM is sensitive (i.e., becomes more irreversible) to changes in numerical parameters and horizontal resolution.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Atmospheric Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Atomspheric Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Renno, Nilton O.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleApplication of the heat engine framework to modeling of large-scale atmospheric convectionen_US
dc.creatorAdams, David Kentonen_US
dc.contributor.authorAdams, David Kentonen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe heat engine framework is examined in terms of large-scale atmospheric convection in order to investigate several theoretical and modeling issues related to the steady-state convecting atmosphere. Applications of the heat engine framework to convective circulations are reviewed. It is shown that this framework provides fundamental insights into the nature of various atmospheric phenomena and estimates of their potential intensity. The framework is shown to be valid for both reversible and irreversible systems; the irreversible processes' sole effect is to reduce the thermodynamic efficiency of the convective heat engine. The heat engine framework is then employed to demonstrate that the two asymptotic limits of quasi-equilibrium theory are consistent. That is, the fractional area covered by convection goes to zero, σ → 0, as the ratio of the convective adjustment to large-scale time scale (e.g. radiative time scale) go to zero, tADJ/tLS →0 , despite recent arguments to the contrary. Furthermore, the heat engine framework is utilized to develop a methodology for assessing the strength of irreversibilities in numerical models. Using the explicit energy budget, we derive thermodynamic efficiencies based on work and the heat budget for both open (e.g., the Hadley circulation) and closed (e.g., the general circulation) thermodynamic systems. In addition, the Carnot efficiency for closed systems is calculated to ascertain the maximum efficiency possible. Comparison of the work-based efficiency with that of the efficiency based on the heat budget provides a gauge for assessing how close to reversible model-generated circulations are. A battery of experiments is carried out with an idealized GCM. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated and it is shown that an essentially reversible GCM is sensitive (i.e., becomes more irreversible) to changes in numerical parameters and horizontal resolution.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Atmospheric Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAtomspheric Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRenno, Nilton O.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3106965en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44639090en_US
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