Macroecology: Going from patterns to processes, a theory and its test

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280311
Title:
Macroecology: Going from patterns to processes, a theory and its test
Author:
McGill, Brian James
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation focuses on two patterns in macroecology. The first describes the distribution of abundances between species (SAD) within a single community. The second describes the structure of abundance across a species range (SAASR). The central result is that the SAASR, combined with some other assumptions, can be shown both theoretically and empirically to explain the SAD (as well as several other patterns such as the species area relationship or SPAR). Given the increased importance of the SAASR pattern, I then provide an extensive analysis of empirical data to test for the existence and exact nature of the SAASR as well as developing the first quantitative assessments of proposed mechanisms underlying the SAASR. I also clarify a current point of confusion about SADs: whether they are truly log left-skewed. I next present a philosophy of science paper on how best to test macroecological theories. Finally, I apply this approach to a well-known macroecological theory that is generally considered to be strongly tested and show that the existing tests are, in fact, weak.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rosenzweig, Michael L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMacroecology: Going from patterns to processes, a theory and its testen_US
dc.creatorMcGill, Brian Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGill, Brian Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation focuses on two patterns in macroecology. The first describes the distribution of abundances between species (SAD) within a single community. The second describes the structure of abundance across a species range (SAASR). The central result is that the SAASR, combined with some other assumptions, can be shown both theoretically and empirically to explain the SAD (as well as several other patterns such as the species area relationship or SPAR). Given the increased importance of the SAASR pattern, I then provide an extensive analysis of empirical data to test for the existence and exact nature of the SAASR as well as developing the first quantitative assessments of proposed mechanisms underlying the SAASR. I also clarify a current point of confusion about SADs: whether they are truly log left-skewed. I next present a philosophy of science paper on how best to test macroecological theories. Finally, I apply this approach to a well-known macroecological theory that is generally considered to be strongly tested and show that the existing tests are, in fact, weak.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRosenzweig, Michael L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3089993en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44425211en_US
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