From 'spoken of' to speakers: Chicago immigrant women's writing, 1890-1940

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280310
Title:
From 'spoken of' to speakers: Chicago immigrant women's writing, 1890-1940
Author:
McMillan, Gloria L.
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Historians have widely studied and discussed the Progressive era in the United States, including the efforts of English-speaking women's organizations in civic activism. However, few or no studies explore the rhetorical process by which immigrant women forged a bilingual path into American society. Because of prior publicity, a number of early twentieth century immigrants tried to act upon the idea that the United States could be a fresh start for them, putting their plans for social and educational advancement into print. My study takes a structural approach to comparing the writing of three immigrant women, viewing these texts as sites of what Walter Fisher calls the narrative model of rhetoric. In particular, this analysis demonstrates how narratives made of such elements as Ernest Bormann's "fantasy themes" provide "good reasons" for action. Thus, this inquiry focuses on at least two aspects of rhetoric, particularly the role that these women's writing played in educating their communities about public issues, often employing an oblique style of stories and anecdotes. First, it explores the ways that literacy exercised an empowering role both in and beyond classrooms to open a social space for these writers, both as immigrants and as women. Secondly, my project furthers the conversation initiated by people such as Jane Addams and John Dewey by connecting their work with today's theorists such as Theresa Enos, Sally Miller Gearhart, and Sonja Foss.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Bilingual and Multicultural.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.; Language, Rhetoric and Composition.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enos, Theresa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFrom 'spoken of' to speakers: Chicago immigrant women's writing, 1890-1940en_US
dc.creatorMcMillan, Gloria L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, Gloria L.en_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHistorians have widely studied and discussed the Progressive era in the United States, including the efforts of English-speaking women's organizations in civic activism. However, few or no studies explore the rhetorical process by which immigrant women forged a bilingual path into American society. Because of prior publicity, a number of early twentieth century immigrants tried to act upon the idea that the United States could be a fresh start for them, putting their plans for social and educational advancement into print. My study takes a structural approach to comparing the writing of three immigrant women, viewing these texts as sites of what Walter Fisher calls the narrative model of rhetoric. In particular, this analysis demonstrates how narratives made of such elements as Ernest Bormann's "fantasy themes" provide "good reasons" for action. Thus, this inquiry focuses on at least two aspects of rhetoric, particularly the role that these women's writing played in educating their communities about public issues, often employing an oblique style of stories and anecdotes. First, it explores the ways that literacy exercised an empowering role both in and beyond classrooms to open a social space for these writers, both as immigrants and as women. Secondly, my project furthers the conversation initiated by people such as Jane Addams and John Dewey by connecting their work with today's theorists such as Theresa Enos, Sally Miller Gearhart, and Sonja Foss.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual and Multicultural.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Rhetoric and Composition.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3089990en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44425168en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.