Multilayered ceramic/metal composites by extrusion freeform fabrication

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280308
Title:
Multilayered ceramic/metal composites by extrusion freeform fabrication
Author:
Kasichainula, Sridhar
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Metal layers within a laminar ceramic can improve damage tolerance of ceramics by arresting large cracks either by ductile bridging or by crack deflection at the ceramic/metal interface, which will allow engineers to design reliable ceramics for structural applications. At low volume fractions of the metal ductile bridging is not very effective, mainly owing to decreased distance between the crack tip and next ceramic layer. Significant increase in the energy absorption during fracture can come from delamination, but depends on the interfacial fracture resistance. A two-fold increase in energy absorption is realized in the case of glass-ceramic/silver laminates prepared by extrusion freeform fabrication. Interfacial fracture energy for glass-ceramic/silver is found to be 100 J/m² in comparison to 15 J/m² for glass-ceramic/SiC, which should explain the sporadic crack deflection in notched four-point bend. For a short beam flexural test shear failure is more favorable in four-point than in three-point bending. In four-point tests, the shear stresses between the outer and inner loading pins can precipitate shear delamination prior to tensile cracking of the layers. Damage modes under low velocity impact tests are similar to four-point bend showing delamination as primary energy dissipation mechanism.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Electronics and Electrical.; Engineering, Materials Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Materials Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Calvert, Paul D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMultilayered ceramic/metal composites by extrusion freeform fabricationen_US
dc.creatorKasichainula, Sridharen_US
dc.contributor.authorKasichainula, Sridharen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMetal layers within a laminar ceramic can improve damage tolerance of ceramics by arresting large cracks either by ductile bridging or by crack deflection at the ceramic/metal interface, which will allow engineers to design reliable ceramics for structural applications. At low volume fractions of the metal ductile bridging is not very effective, mainly owing to decreased distance between the crack tip and next ceramic layer. Significant increase in the energy absorption during fracture can come from delamination, but depends on the interfacial fracture resistance. A two-fold increase in energy absorption is realized in the case of glass-ceramic/silver laminates prepared by extrusion freeform fabrication. Interfacial fracture energy for glass-ceramic/silver is found to be 100 J/m² in comparison to 15 J/m² for glass-ceramic/SiC, which should explain the sporadic crack deflection in notched four-point bend. For a short beam flexural test shear failure is more favorable in four-point than in three-point bending. In four-point tests, the shear stresses between the outer and inner loading pins can precipitate shear delamination prior to tensile cracking of the layers. Damage modes under low velocity impact tests are similar to four-point bend showing delamination as primary energy dissipation mechanism.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCalvert, Paul D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010226en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4161284xen_US
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