Values, deviance and conformity: Measuring values with the factorial survey method

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280298
Title:
Values, deviance and conformity: Measuring values with the factorial survey method
Author:
Konty, Mark A.
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The value concept is regularly employed by sociologists and social psychologists. Despite the ubiquitous nature of the concept, values are not a relevant theoretical construct in much social theory and the concept remains difficult to measure. This project tackles both theoretical and methodological shortcomings in the study and application of values. Two cutting edge methods of value measurement are used--the Schwartz Value Survey and the factorial survey method--and their results compared to assess the validity of these measures. There is little convergent validity with these two methods, perhaps due to some of the difficulties encountered when measuring values in the first place. In terms of content validity, both measures of values demonstrate a relationship between people's values and their deviant behavior. Surprisingly, this result has been difficult to obtain in the criminological literature. A theory that specifies a direct mechanism between values and deviance--cultural deviance theory--is tested. Evidence supports the notion that people who are more likely to be deviant, are also more likely to place a higher priority on "subterranean" values for wealth, aggression, competition, and beating the system, while simultaneously placing a low priority on "mainstream" values like trustworthiness and equality. Results could also apply to other criminological theories that have previously ignored values as an important theoretical construct.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sociology, Theory and Methods.; Psychology, Social.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Smith-Lovin, Lynn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleValues, deviance and conformity: Measuring values with the factorial survey methoden_US
dc.creatorKonty, Mark A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKonty, Mark A.en_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe value concept is regularly employed by sociologists and social psychologists. Despite the ubiquitous nature of the concept, values are not a relevant theoretical construct in much social theory and the concept remains difficult to measure. This project tackles both theoretical and methodological shortcomings in the study and application of values. Two cutting edge methods of value measurement are used--the Schwartz Value Survey and the factorial survey method--and their results compared to assess the validity of these measures. There is little convergent validity with these two methods, perhaps due to some of the difficulties encountered when measuring values in the first place. In terms of content validity, both measures of values demonstrate a relationship between people's values and their deviant behavior. Surprisingly, this result has been difficult to obtain in the criminological literature. A theory that specifies a direct mechanism between values and deviance--cultural deviance theory--is tested. Evidence supports the notion that people who are more likely to be deviant, are also more likely to place a higher priority on "subterranean" values for wealth, aggression, competition, and beating the system, while simultaneously placing a low priority on "mainstream" values like trustworthiness and equality. Results could also apply to other criminological theories that have previously ignored values as an important theoretical construct.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Theory and Methods.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSmith-Lovin, Lynnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3089974en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44422842en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.