Negative thoughts about making changes: Testing a cognitive-behavioral theory of noncompliance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280286
Title:
Negative thoughts about making changes: Testing a cognitive-behavioral theory of noncompliance
Author:
Bishop, Bruce Alexander
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Despite the demonstrated efficacy of psychotherapy in the treatment of a variety of psychological difficulties, a persistent problem is resistance to and noncompliance with that treatment. Cognitive-Behavioral therapists theorize that clients' negative beliefs and attitudes about the effectiveness of treatment, their ability to complete therapeutic assignments, and so on, are primary underlying causes of noncompliance. This dissertation tested this model. Twenty-eight individuals experiencing high levels of perceived stress completed a six week stress management training course. Measures of stress, beliefs about making changes, and compliance with treatment directives were made at regular intervals. The statistical technique called mediational analysis was used to test a causal linkage from negative attitudes and beliefs to treatment compliance, and from compliance to outcome. Although participants' mean levels of stress and distress showed significant reductions, there was little support for the proposed beliefs-compliance-outcome model. Alternative explanations for these results were considered. Support was expressed for continued development of the Negative Beliefs about Changing measure.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Psychology, Clinical.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Arkowitz, Hal

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNegative thoughts about making changes: Testing a cognitive-behavioral theory of noncomplianceen_US
dc.creatorBishop, Bruce Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.authorBishop, Bruce Alexanderen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDespite the demonstrated efficacy of psychotherapy in the treatment of a variety of psychological difficulties, a persistent problem is resistance to and noncompliance with that treatment. Cognitive-Behavioral therapists theorize that clients' negative beliefs and attitudes about the effectiveness of treatment, their ability to complete therapeutic assignments, and so on, are primary underlying causes of noncompliance. This dissertation tested this model. Twenty-eight individuals experiencing high levels of perceived stress completed a six week stress management training course. Measures of stress, beliefs about making changes, and compliance with treatment directives were made at regular intervals. The statistical technique called mediational analysis was used to test a causal linkage from negative attitudes and beliefs to treatment compliance, and from compliance to outcome. Although participants' mean levels of stress and distress showed significant reductions, there was little support for the proposed beliefs-compliance-outcome model. Alternative explanations for these results were considered. Support was expressed for continued development of the Negative Beliefs about Changing measure.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorArkowitz, Halen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010221en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41611809en_US
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