Breaching the nurse-patient therapeutic relationship: A grounded theory study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280243
Title:
Breaching the nurse-patient therapeutic relationship: A grounded theory study
Author:
Pennington, Margaret Sue
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The therapeutic nurse-patient relationship is the core of nursing practice. This grounded theory study used symbolic interactionism, identity theory and ethics as a theoretical perspective to examine nurse-patient relationships. The opinions and experiences of twelve professional nurses were explored to discover the process and events involved when a nurse engaged in a nontherapeutic relationship with a patient. A core process, Breaching the Nurse-Patient Relationship, was identified from the interviews. The core process identified three stages in the process with conditions in each stage that showed progression from each condition in each stage to the next stage. The first stage in the process revealed five conditions that make the nurse vulnerable for engaging in nontherapeutic activities with a patient. Stage one, with the five conditions, was the preliminary process that lead to stage two. In stage two, the nurse engaged in nontherapeutic activities/relationships with the patient. The nurse was either under-involved or over-involved in the nurse-patient relationship but clearly the nurse deviated from the therapeutic realm of the relationship. There were eight conditions in stage two that identified the process of the nurse leaving the therapeutic role to engage in a nontherapeutic role with the patient. The last stage was characterized by the consequences that the nurse, patient and profession of nursing had to face as a result of the nontherapeutic nurse-patient relationship.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nursing.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Badger, Terry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBreaching the nurse-patient therapeutic relationship: A grounded theory studyen_US
dc.creatorPennington, Margaret Sueen_US
dc.contributor.authorPennington, Margaret Sueen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe therapeutic nurse-patient relationship is the core of nursing practice. This grounded theory study used symbolic interactionism, identity theory and ethics as a theoretical perspective to examine nurse-patient relationships. The opinions and experiences of twelve professional nurses were explored to discover the process and events involved when a nurse engaged in a nontherapeutic relationship with a patient. A core process, Breaching the Nurse-Patient Relationship, was identified from the interviews. The core process identified three stages in the process with conditions in each stage that showed progression from each condition in each stage to the next stage. The first stage in the process revealed five conditions that make the nurse vulnerable for engaging in nontherapeutic activities with a patient. Stage one, with the five conditions, was the preliminary process that lead to stage two. In stage two, the nurse engaged in nontherapeutic activities/relationships with the patient. The nurse was either under-involved or over-involved in the nurse-patient relationship but clearly the nurse deviated from the therapeutic realm of the relationship. There were eight conditions in stage two that identified the process of the nurse leaving the therapeutic role to engage in a nontherapeutic role with the patient. The last stage was characterized by the consequences that the nurse, patient and profession of nursing had to face as a result of the nontherapeutic nurse-patient relationship.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBadger, Terryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073302en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43473258en_US
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