Photoinitiated destabilization of sterically stabilized liposomes for enhanced drug delivery

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280209
Title:
Photoinitiated destabilization of sterically stabilized liposomes for enhanced drug delivery
Author:
Spratt, Paul Anthony
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of liposomes for the delivery of therapeutic agents to tumor sites took a major step forward with the introduction of sterically stabilized liposomes (PEG-liposomes). Several research groups reported the increased localization of PEG-liposomes at tumor sites. Once PEG-liposomes reach these sites, it can be desirable to increase the rate of release of encapsulated compound(s). The use of radiation for this purpose is attractive, because it can be delivered in a spatially and temporally selective manner. An effective strategy for the photopertubation of PEG-liposomes relies on the photoinitiated polymerization of reactive lipids in the liposomal bilayer. Previous studies indicated that the inclusion of the photoreactive 1,2-bis[10-(2' ,4'-hexadienoyloxy)decanonyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (bis-SorbPC17,17) among the lipids of PEG-liposomes had little effect on their permeability until the PEG-liposomes were exposed to UV light. Photoexposure increased the permeability of the PEG-liposomes 200-fold. Research in this dissertation was focused upon increasing the reactivity of PEG-liposomes to UV and ionizing radiations. Additionally, the most favorable formulations were then used for the encapsulation of chemotherapeutic compounds that are currently on the market. Results in this dissertation indicate the ability to encapsulate water soluble compounds with high efficiency and subsequently release those compounds with minimal UV light exposure and with ionizing radiation doses that approach therapeutic levels.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chemistry, Pharmaceutical.; Chemistry, Polymer.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
O'Brien, David F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePhotoinitiated destabilization of sterically stabilized liposomes for enhanced drug deliveryen_US
dc.creatorSpratt, Paul Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpratt, Paul Anthonyen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of liposomes for the delivery of therapeutic agents to tumor sites took a major step forward with the introduction of sterically stabilized liposomes (PEG-liposomes). Several research groups reported the increased localization of PEG-liposomes at tumor sites. Once PEG-liposomes reach these sites, it can be desirable to increase the rate of release of encapsulated compound(s). The use of radiation for this purpose is attractive, because it can be delivered in a spatially and temporally selective manner. An effective strategy for the photopertubation of PEG-liposomes relies on the photoinitiated polymerization of reactive lipids in the liposomal bilayer. Previous studies indicated that the inclusion of the photoreactive 1,2-bis[10-(2' ,4'-hexadienoyloxy)decanonyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (bis-SorbPC17,17) among the lipids of PEG-liposomes had little effect on their permeability until the PEG-liposomes were exposed to UV light. Photoexposure increased the permeability of the PEG-liposomes 200-fold. Research in this dissertation was focused upon increasing the reactivity of PEG-liposomes to UV and ionizing radiations. Additionally, the most favorable formulations were then used for the encapsulation of chemotherapeutic compounds that are currently on the market. Results in this dissertation indicate the ability to encapsulate water soluble compounds with high efficiency and subsequently release those compounds with minimal UV light exposure and with ionizing radiation doses that approach therapeutic levels.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Pharmaceutical.en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Polymer.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorO'Brien, David F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073259en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43476053en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.