Confronting neoliberalism: Food security and nutrition among indigenous coffee-growers in Oaxaca, Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280204
Title:
Confronting neoliberalism: Food security and nutrition among indigenous coffee-growers in Oaxaca, Mexico
Author:
Sesia, Paola Maria
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation analyzes the social history and current struggles of Analco and Santa Cecilia, two Chinantec peasant localities of Oaxaca, Mexico, which experienced the boom and bust years of coffee agriculture subject to the vagaries of the global market for this cash crop. It examines the last twenty-five years of State interventions toward the Indian peasantry, focusing especially on current neoliberal economic and social policies, to reveal how they have affected local well-being and livelihood strategies. In the course of describing food security and nutrition, I show how Analqueno and Cecilieno men, women and children have coped with major changes in Mexican politics and the economy; changes toward which they have devised multiple responses, but upon which they have had limited control. In particular, I explore how members of these communities weighed options and maximized opportunities in their attempt to maintain, restore or enhance food security and local well-being during the coffee crisis of the 1990s. I show how, in the last decade, agricultural diversification for both home consumption and the market, and a partial retreat from commercial agriculture centered around coffee have become significant. Finally, I consider the nutritional effects of the coffee boom and bust years on the local populations paying particular attention to children, teenagers, and gender differences.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Economics, Agricultural.; Health Sciences, Nutrition.; Sociology, Public and Social Welfare.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nichter, Mark

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleConfronting neoliberalism: Food security and nutrition among indigenous coffee-growers in Oaxaca, Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorSesia, Paola Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSesia, Paola Mariaen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation analyzes the social history and current struggles of Analco and Santa Cecilia, two Chinantec peasant localities of Oaxaca, Mexico, which experienced the boom and bust years of coffee agriculture subject to the vagaries of the global market for this cash crop. It examines the last twenty-five years of State interventions toward the Indian peasantry, focusing especially on current neoliberal economic and social policies, to reveal how they have affected local well-being and livelihood strategies. In the course of describing food security and nutrition, I show how Analqueno and Cecilieno men, women and children have coped with major changes in Mexican politics and the economy; changes toward which they have devised multiple responses, but upon which they have had limited control. In particular, I explore how members of these communities weighed options and maximized opportunities in their attempt to maintain, restore or enhance food security and local well-being during the coffee crisis of the 1990s. I show how, in the last decade, agricultural diversification for both home consumption and the market, and a partial retreat from commercial agriculture centered around coffee have become significant. Finally, I consider the nutritional effects of the coffee boom and bust years on the local populations paying particular attention to children, teenagers, and gender differences.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Agricultural.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Public and Social Welfare.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichter, Marken_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073254en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4347598xen_US
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