Business as usual: Factors influencing collection development and management of business information resources in borderlands public libraries

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280196
Title:
Business as usual: Factors influencing collection development and management of business information resources in borderlands public libraries
Author:
Alexander, Gwendolyn
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this research is to define grounded theoretical models about factors that influence collection development and collection management of business information resources in public libraries. The study is based on data collected from a multi-site case study of public libraries along the U.S.-Mexico border where there is a critical need for information on starting and expanding small businesses. A framework of structuration theory and cultural hegemony theory informs an analysis of the data. This paper relates to the relevant literature and sets forth implications for research, practice, and further discussion. The three main categories identified from coding the data are library location, modes of production and distribution of business information resources, and the degree of external stakeholder pressure on library business collections. Three model statements defined and supported by the data are: (1) the attributes of funding, librarian qualifications, access to information and communication technologies, size and qualities of the business community, and client expectations that influence business collection development are related to library location in metropolitan or rural areas; (2) new practices in the production of content, formats, and modes of distribution of business materials are more problematic for small libraries due to limited information and communication technology (ICT) devices and insufficient professional training; and (3) external influences and initiatives, such as federal, state, and foundation programs, have more of an impact on business collection development in small libraries than in large libraries. The various properties of these factors are discussed with a focus on how daily routine, tacit awareness, and expectations draw on structural rules and resources to produce and reproduce, or change, library systems and their business collections. The consequences of location in metropolitan or rural areas are identified, and mitigating strategies are suggested. External influences and new modes of production and distribution of business information are implicated in supporting the cultural hegemony of globalization by encouraging the introduction and use of ICTs in public libraries; however, use of ICTs to expand the business collection is dependent upon librarian interest and abilities as well as competing demands for scarce resources.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Library Science.; Education, Business.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Information Resources and Library Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Seavey, Charles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBusiness as usual: Factors influencing collection development and management of business information resources in borderlands public librariesen_US
dc.creatorAlexander, Gwendolynen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Gwendolynen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research is to define grounded theoretical models about factors that influence collection development and collection management of business information resources in public libraries. The study is based on data collected from a multi-site case study of public libraries along the U.S.-Mexico border where there is a critical need for information on starting and expanding small businesses. A framework of structuration theory and cultural hegemony theory informs an analysis of the data. This paper relates to the relevant literature and sets forth implications for research, practice, and further discussion. The three main categories identified from coding the data are library location, modes of production and distribution of business information resources, and the degree of external stakeholder pressure on library business collections. Three model statements defined and supported by the data are: (1) the attributes of funding, librarian qualifications, access to information and communication technologies, size and qualities of the business community, and client expectations that influence business collection development are related to library location in metropolitan or rural areas; (2) new practices in the production of content, formats, and modes of distribution of business materials are more problematic for small libraries due to limited information and communication technology (ICT) devices and insufficient professional training; and (3) external influences and initiatives, such as federal, state, and foundation programs, have more of an impact on business collection development in small libraries than in large libraries. The various properties of these factors are discussed with a focus on how daily routine, tacit awareness, and expectations draw on structural rules and resources to produce and reproduce, or change, library systems and their business collections. The consequences of location in metropolitan or rural areas are identified, and mitigating strategies are suggested. External influences and new modes of production and distribution of business information are implicated in supporting the cultural hegemony of globalization by encouraging the introduction and use of ICTs in public libraries; however, use of ICTs to expand the business collection is dependent upon librarian interest and abilities as well as competing demands for scarce resources.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLibrary Science.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Business.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInformation Resources and Library Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSeavey, Charlesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010211en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41611688en_US
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