Towards a theory of panethnicity: Explaining the formationof panethnic boundaries among Asian Americans, 1965-1995

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280185
Title:
Towards a theory of panethnicity: Explaining the formationof panethnic boundaries among Asian Americans, 1965-1995
Author:
Okamoto, Dina Gail
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation explores the ways in which ethnic boundaries are constructed and reconstructed as expressions of identity, solidarity, and mobilization. In particular, this project documents and attempts to explain the development of panethnicity---solidarity among culturally and linguistically diverse national origin groups---in order to understand the strength of structural conditions in the formation of an ethnic group and to shed light on boundary formation processes. Moving toward the construction of a general theory of panethnicity, I extend competition theory and cultural division of labor theory to make new predictions about when panethnic behavior will increase among Asian Americans from 1970 to the present. I test these new predictions about the structural conditions under which identity, solidarity, and mobilization will emerge using three dependent variables: intermarriage, organizational formation, and collective action. I constructed several data sets documenting patterns of panethnic group formation from census data, government documents, Encyclopedia of Associations, and national newspapers. Using event history, pooled time series, and logistic regression analyses, I find support for the hypothesized relationship between occupational segregation and panethnic behavior which indicates that the mechanisms of dependence and control, rather than competition, are more important for understanding the emergence of panethnic identity, solidarity, and mobilization.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Soule, Sarah

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTowards a theory of panethnicity: Explaining the formationof panethnic boundaries among Asian Americans, 1965-1995en_US
dc.creatorOkamoto, Dina Gailen_US
dc.contributor.authorOkamoto, Dina Gailen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the ways in which ethnic boundaries are constructed and reconstructed as expressions of identity, solidarity, and mobilization. In particular, this project documents and attempts to explain the development of panethnicity---solidarity among culturally and linguistically diverse national origin groups---in order to understand the strength of structural conditions in the formation of an ethnic group and to shed light on boundary formation processes. Moving toward the construction of a general theory of panethnicity, I extend competition theory and cultural division of labor theory to make new predictions about when panethnic behavior will increase among Asian Americans from 1970 to the present. I test these new predictions about the structural conditions under which identity, solidarity, and mobilization will emerge using three dependent variables: intermarriage, organizational formation, and collective action. I constructed several data sets documenting patterns of panethnic group formation from census data, government documents, Encyclopedia of Associations, and national newspapers. Using event history, pooled time series, and logistic regression analyses, I find support for the hypothesized relationship between occupational segregation and panethnic behavior which indicates that the mechanisms of dependence and control, rather than competition, are more important for understanding the emergence of panethnic identity, solidarity, and mobilization.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSoule, Sarahen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010209en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41611627en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.