Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280183
Title:
Postsecondary learning strategy instruction and student outcomes
Author:
Hartman, Stacey Lynn
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
With a pronounced move toward student-centered learning and academic self-regulation, the responsibility of learning is shifting from teacher to student. As a result, students are now being asked to take more responsibility for their learning. Research has made clear that strategic behavior and the use of learning strategies enhances teaming. Effective learners are able to self-regulate in order to evaluate when and how to use the appropriate strategies as well as evaluate their success relative to their actions. Students often enter postsecondary education without the knowledge and skills to self-regulate; therefore, learning strategy instruction becomes a key instrument in students' pursuit of academic success. Quantitative examination of the students' outcomes associated with this type of instruction is limited at best. This study examines student outcomes associated with the attendance of learning strategies workshops at the postsecondary level. Findings indicated that participants reported using some, if not all, of the strategies discussed. Additionally the largest percentage of strategies reported were strategies that were supported instructionally by modeling, practice, and feedback. This study did not uncover particular student traits that would lead to students' use of strategies. Strengths and weaknesses of this study are discussed, as are directions for future research.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCaslin, Mary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePostsecondary learning strategy instruction and student outcomesen_US
dc.creatorHartman, Stacey Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorHartman, Stacey Lynnen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWith a pronounced move toward student-centered learning and academic self-regulation, the responsibility of learning is shifting from teacher to student. As a result, students are now being asked to take more responsibility for their learning. Research has made clear that strategic behavior and the use of learning strategies enhances teaming. Effective learners are able to self-regulate in order to evaluate when and how to use the appropriate strategies as well as evaluate their success relative to their actions. Students often enter postsecondary education without the knowledge and skills to self-regulate; therefore, learning strategy instruction becomes a key instrument in students' pursuit of academic success. Quantitative examination of the students' outcomes associated with this type of instruction is limited at best. This study examines student outcomes associated with the attendance of learning strategies workshops at the postsecondary level. Findings indicated that participants reported using some, if not all, of the strategies discussed. Additionally the largest percentage of strategies reported were strategies that were supported instructionally by modeling, practice, and feedback. This study did not uncover particular student traits that would lead to students' use of strategies. Strengths and weaknesses of this study are discussed, as are directions for future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCaslin, Maryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073229en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43471936en_US
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