The politics and possibilities of integrative medicine: An anthropological analysis of pluralistic health care movements in America

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280174
Title:
The politics and possibilities of integrative medicine: An anthropological analysis of pluralistic health care movements in America
Author:
Olson, Brooke
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation, I explore health care movements as social movements which are complexly embedded in history, culture, and political economy. In order to illuminate issues of power, gender, economics, and modality and practitioner politics, medical pluralism and health movements are examined from nineteenth century eclecticism to the current interest in integrative medicine. From the Thompsonian health movement of the 1830's to the fluorescence of alternative healing in the 1960's and 1990's, the dissertation takes the reader through the multifaceted health and healing landscape. This winding path leads up to the current immense interest in and use of non-biomedical therapies in the United States. Using theoretical orientations from phenomenology to critical medical anthropology, the dissertation examines integrative healing movements in local and national contexts. Locally, ethnographic work was based in Ithaca, NY, through participant observation with Ithaca's Integrative Community Wellness Center, a nonprofit grassroots initiative that aims to provide comprehensive wellness care in community contexts. Nationally, I examine the roles of institutions such as HMO's and hospitals. Alternative, complementary, and integrative healing movements have become a profound part of popular and medical cultures, yet they have heretofore not been a major focus of anthropological or social science research. The dissertation is a contribution to understanding the nature and dynamics of these phenomena and what the future may hold for the use and combination of pluralistic approaches to health and wellness care.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Mass Communications.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nichter, Mark

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe politics and possibilities of integrative medicine: An anthropological analysis of pluralistic health care movements in Americaen_US
dc.creatorOlson, Brookeen_US
dc.contributor.authorOlson, Brookeen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I explore health care movements as social movements which are complexly embedded in history, culture, and political economy. In order to illuminate issues of power, gender, economics, and modality and practitioner politics, medical pluralism and health movements are examined from nineteenth century eclecticism to the current interest in integrative medicine. From the Thompsonian health movement of the 1830's to the fluorescence of alternative healing in the 1960's and 1990's, the dissertation takes the reader through the multifaceted health and healing landscape. This winding path leads up to the current immense interest in and use of non-biomedical therapies in the United States. Using theoretical orientations from phenomenology to critical medical anthropology, the dissertation examines integrative healing movements in local and national contexts. Locally, ethnographic work was based in Ithaca, NY, through participant observation with Ithaca's Integrative Community Wellness Center, a nonprofit grassroots initiative that aims to provide comprehensive wellness care in community contexts. Nationally, I examine the roles of institutions such as HMO's and hospitals. Alternative, complementary, and integrative healing movements have become a profound part of popular and medical cultures, yet they have heretofore not been a major focus of anthropological or social science research. The dissertation is a contribution to understanding the nature and dynamics of these phenomena and what the future may hold for the use and combination of pluralistic approaches to health and wellness care.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichter, Marken_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010208en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41611597en_US
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