Linking patch dynamics, landscape organization, patch-size scaling, and landscape connectivity

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280167
Title:
Linking patch dynamics, landscape organization, patch-size scaling, and landscape connectivity
Author:
DiBari, John Nicholas
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Over time, small local disturbances may result in large regional changes in landscape structure and function. For example, lightning strikes may lead to large-scale wildfire or land clearing to urbanization. In either case, landscape patterns change as the type and distribution of landscape elements change in response to disturbances. Additionally, changes in landscape patterns often affect ecological processes. For example, wildfires and urbanization affect succession and productivity, which changes the distribution of habitat features, and which may affect landscape connectivity for species inhabiting the landscape. I used rank-size distributions and their scaling exponents to illustrate landscape character and change in Yellowstone National Park and a portion of the metropolitan area of Tucson, Arizona, through patterns associated with the distribution of patch size. I found that natural and anthropogenic disturbances affected landscape organization similarly and thus produced similar distributional patterns of patch size. However, the magnitude of change created by natural and anthropogenic disturbances differed. Fires in Yellowstone National Park produced scaling exponents >1, suggesting that large patches affected the distribution of patch size disproportionately. Comparatively, urbanization in the Tucson metropolitan area produced scaling exponents ≈1, suggesting that large and small patches affect the distribution of patch size proportionately. To link changes in landscape patterns with changes in ecological processes I compared four commonly used landscape metrics with rank-size distributions and their scaling exponents. Rank-size distributions described the scaling properties of the landscape with regard to patch size, whereas other metrics did not. This is meaningful because there is an integral relationship between scaling properties of the landscape and scaling properties of species using the landscape. A species may perceive a landscape as connected when the patch-size characteristics of the landscape scale proportionally with the body-size characteristics of the species. As a result, the species may be more likely to move through and therefore persist in that landscape. I develop a theoretical relationship between natural and anthropogenic disturbances, describe landscape organization, and link landscape and species scaling characteristics.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Halvorson, William L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLinking patch dynamics, landscape organization, patch-size scaling, and landscape connectivityen_US
dc.creatorDiBari, John Nicholasen_US
dc.contributor.authorDiBari, John Nicholasen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOver time, small local disturbances may result in large regional changes in landscape structure and function. For example, lightning strikes may lead to large-scale wildfire or land clearing to urbanization. In either case, landscape patterns change as the type and distribution of landscape elements change in response to disturbances. Additionally, changes in landscape patterns often affect ecological processes. For example, wildfires and urbanization affect succession and productivity, which changes the distribution of habitat features, and which may affect landscape connectivity for species inhabiting the landscape. I used rank-size distributions and their scaling exponents to illustrate landscape character and change in Yellowstone National Park and a portion of the metropolitan area of Tucson, Arizona, through patterns associated with the distribution of patch size. I found that natural and anthropogenic disturbances affected landscape organization similarly and thus produced similar distributional patterns of patch size. However, the magnitude of change created by natural and anthropogenic disturbances differed. Fires in Yellowstone National Park produced scaling exponents >1, suggesting that large patches affected the distribution of patch size disproportionately. Comparatively, urbanization in the Tucson metropolitan area produced scaling exponents ≈1, suggesting that large and small patches affect the distribution of patch size proportionately. To link changes in landscape patterns with changes in ecological processes I compared four commonly used landscape metrics with rank-size distributions and their scaling exponents. Rank-size distributions described the scaling properties of the landscape with regard to patch size, whereas other metrics did not. This is meaningful because there is an integral relationship between scaling properties of the landscape and scaling properties of species using the landscape. A species may perceive a landscape as connected when the patch-size characteristics of the landscape scale proportionally with the body-size characteristics of the species. As a result, the species may be more likely to move through and therefore persist in that landscape. I develop a theoretical relationship between natural and anthropogenic disturbances, describe landscape organization, and link landscape and species scaling characteristics.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHalvorson, William L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073213en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43427959en_US
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