"A taste of teaching": Preservice teachers and children engage in literature circles

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280166
Title:
"A taste of teaching": Preservice teachers and children engage in literature circles
Author:
Day, Deanna Lea
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this qualitative teacher research study was to explore the characteristics of literature circles with preservice teachers and children. Drawing on Vygotsky's (1978) sociocultural theory and Rosenblatt's (1938) transactional theory, this study focuses on the talk of preservice teachers in literature circles with children and the perceptions of preservice teachers about these literature circles. The study was conducted in a fourth grade classroom and a university children's literature course in the southwestern United States over one academic year. Thirty children and 27-28 preservice teachers participated in three to five literature circles each semester. A total of 47 literature circles were tape recorded, transcribed and analyzed. Other sources of data included a teaching journal, free writes from participants and interviews with some preservice teachers. The methods of analysis included coding, visual markers and constant comparison. These literature circles were investigated through a detailed description of the data. There were certain characteristics to organizing the discussions such as selecting books, developing the discussion strategies, planning the circles, producing free writes and reflecting on the experience. This study focuses on how the talk of preservice teachers in literature circles with children evolved over time. The results indicate that the preservice teachers initiated and facilitated discussion, asked and answered questions, dominated discussion, listened, supported and explored children's talk, and shared personal connections and responses as a reader. In addition, the study explores preservice teachers' perceptions of literature circles with children. Three major themes were found: The preservice teachers learned about children in the literature circles, how to do circles and the value these circles for children. Finally, the findings illustrate how the literature experience with preservice teachers influenced the children. According to the data, the children had significant relationships with young adults, managed the literature circles, considered different perspectives in the discussions, gained confidence in their ability to talk, gained perspectives on college and acquired personal advocates. This study shows the importance of partnerships between universities and elementary schools. The preservice teachers were given opportunities to experience reading, writing, learning and teaching with children. The college students were able to observe children learning and to reflect on these experiences.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Language and Literature.; Education, Teacher Training.; Education, Reading.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title"A taste of teaching": Preservice teachers and children engage in literature circlesen_US
dc.creatorDay, Deanna Leaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDay, Deanna Leaen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this qualitative teacher research study was to explore the characteristics of literature circles with preservice teachers and children. Drawing on Vygotsky's (1978) sociocultural theory and Rosenblatt's (1938) transactional theory, this study focuses on the talk of preservice teachers in literature circles with children and the perceptions of preservice teachers about these literature circles. The study was conducted in a fourth grade classroom and a university children's literature course in the southwestern United States over one academic year. Thirty children and 27-28 preservice teachers participated in three to five literature circles each semester. A total of 47 literature circles were tape recorded, transcribed and analyzed. Other sources of data included a teaching journal, free writes from participants and interviews with some preservice teachers. The methods of analysis included coding, visual markers and constant comparison. These literature circles were investigated through a detailed description of the data. There were certain characteristics to organizing the discussions such as selecting books, developing the discussion strategies, planning the circles, producing free writes and reflecting on the experience. This study focuses on how the talk of preservice teachers in literature circles with children evolved over time. The results indicate that the preservice teachers initiated and facilitated discussion, asked and answered questions, dominated discussion, listened, supported and explored children's talk, and shared personal connections and responses as a reader. In addition, the study explores preservice teachers' perceptions of literature circles with children. Three major themes were found: The preservice teachers learned about children in the literature circles, how to do circles and the value these circles for children. Finally, the findings illustrate how the literature experience with preservice teachers influenced the children. According to the data, the children had significant relationships with young adults, managed the literature circles, considered different perspectives in the discussions, gained confidence in their ability to talk, gained perspectives on college and acquired personal advocates. This study shows the importance of partnerships between universities and elementary schools. The preservice teachers were given opportunities to experience reading, writing, learning and teaching with children. The college students were able to observe children learning and to reflect on these experiences.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Reading.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073212en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43427911en_US
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