Utilitarian objects in sacred spaces: Ground stone tools in Middle and Late Bronze Age temples in the southern Levant

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280162
Title:
Utilitarian objects in sacred spaces: Ground stone tools in Middle and Late Bronze Age temples in the southern Levant
Author:
Ebeling, Jennie Rebecca
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of this dissertation is to identify and reconstruct activity areas in Middle and Late Bronze Age (ca. 2000-1200 BCE) temples and sanctuaries in the southern Levant by analyzing the ground stone artifacts found in them. Chapter 1 reviews the history of research of Middle and Late Bronze Age temples in Israel, the Palestinian Authority and Jordan, and briefly describes the physical remains of the Canaanite cult and other activities associated with temples and sanctuaries. The history of ground stone tools from prehistory through the Iron Age is the focus of Chapter 2, which emphasizes the ritual character of certain stone tool types from the fifth-fourth millennium BCE in this region. Stone tools from temple complexes excavated at Hazor, Tel Nami, Megiddo, Tel Mevorakh, Tell Kittan, Bet Shean, Tell el-Hayyat, Deir 'Alla and Lachish are included in the typology and catalogue presented in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 provides an analysis of each temple complex and the reconstruction of some of the activities associated with the ground stone artifacts found in them. Evidence for the presentation of offerings, ritual disposal of cultic equipment, use of liquids, food and pigment processing and other activities is summarized in the conclusion in Chapter 5.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Near Eastern Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dever, William G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUtilitarian objects in sacred spaces: Ground stone tools in Middle and Late Bronze Age temples in the southern Levanten_US
dc.creatorEbeling, Jennie Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorEbeling, Jennie Rebeccaen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this dissertation is to identify and reconstruct activity areas in Middle and Late Bronze Age (ca. 2000-1200 BCE) temples and sanctuaries in the southern Levant by analyzing the ground stone artifacts found in them. Chapter 1 reviews the history of research of Middle and Late Bronze Age temples in Israel, the Palestinian Authority and Jordan, and briefly describes the physical remains of the Canaanite cult and other activities associated with temples and sanctuaries. The history of ground stone tools from prehistory through the Iron Age is the focus of Chapter 2, which emphasizes the ritual character of certain stone tool types from the fifth-fourth millennium BCE in this region. Stone tools from temple complexes excavated at Hazor, Tel Nami, Megiddo, Tel Mevorakh, Tell Kittan, Bet Shean, Tell el-Hayyat, Deir 'Alla and Lachish are included in the typology and catalogue presented in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 provides an analysis of each temple complex and the reconstruction of some of the activities associated with the ground stone artifacts found in them. Evidence for the presentation of offerings, ritual disposal of cultic equipment, use of liquids, food and pigment processing and other activities is summarized in the conclusion in Chapter 5.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDever, William G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010206en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41611548en_US
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