In NBC we trust: The public interest, hegemony, and the "Today"show, 1952-1958

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280158
Title:
In NBC we trust: The public interest, hegemony, and the "Today"show, 1952-1958
Author:
Callie, Mary Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation considers processes of hegemony, or the construction of consent, in network television marketing practices in the 1950s. Specifically, a case study of the Today show, which premiered in 1952, examines how RCA, and subsidiary network NBC, generated consent for continuing domination of the national television airwaves. In the context of post-World War II concern about the place of the multi-national corporations and the media in American democracy, RCA/NBC constructed its company, programming, and the image of its audience within a nexus of anti-trust, good trust (or legal monopolies/public utilities), and free speech/free press regulations. To understand this regulatory context, the study begins by identifying the deep structural contradictions of liberal democratic capitalism and the political economic conditions which demand that power, privilege, and control be legitimated. These conditions shape rhetorics of common interest through which groups and individuals---empowered by the state with delegated authority---seek to establish and maintain consent. This control is constructed as an exception to the rules of free trade and free speech/press. In the end, the study suggests that processes of hegemony construct market control---and consumer free choice---as natural, preordained, and in the best interests of the public as a whole, while downplaying, denying, or discrediting any other real alternatives or possibilities. The particular findings of this deep historical and case study can inform present day broadcast reform efforts and offer core approaches for re-framing hegemonic corporate rationales.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; History, United States.; Business Administration, Marketing.; Mass Communications.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Meehan, Eileen R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIn NBC we trust: The public interest, hegemony, and the "Today"show, 1952-1958en_US
dc.creatorCallie, Mary Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorCallie, Mary Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation considers processes of hegemony, or the construction of consent, in network television marketing practices in the 1950s. Specifically, a case study of the Today show, which premiered in 1952, examines how RCA, and subsidiary network NBC, generated consent for continuing domination of the national television airwaves. In the context of post-World War II concern about the place of the multi-national corporations and the media in American democracy, RCA/NBC constructed its company, programming, and the image of its audience within a nexus of anti-trust, good trust (or legal monopolies/public utilities), and free speech/free press regulations. To understand this regulatory context, the study begins by identifying the deep structural contradictions of liberal democratic capitalism and the political economic conditions which demand that power, privilege, and control be legitimated. These conditions shape rhetorics of common interest through which groups and individuals---empowered by the state with delegated authority---seek to establish and maintain consent. This control is constructed as an exception to the rules of free trade and free speech/press. In the end, the study suggests that processes of hegemony construct market control---and consumer free choice---as natural, preordained, and in the best interests of the public as a whole, while downplaying, denying, or discrediting any other real alternatives or possibilities. The particular findings of this deep historical and case study can inform present day broadcast reform efforts and offer core approaches for re-framing hegemonic corporate rationales.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural and Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMeehan, Eileen R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073203en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4342773xen_US
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