Navajo children and families living with fetal alcohol syndrome/fetal alcohol effects

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280150
Title:
Navajo children and families living with fetal alcohol syndrome/fetal alcohol effects
Author:
Beckett, Cynthia Diane
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The aim of the study was to develop a culturally sensitive Grounded Theory of Navajo parenting for families who are living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)/Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE). The research question was: What are the social and cultural factors and processes that Navajo families use to mange care for a child with FAS/FAE? The philosophical perspectives that guided the study were: the Navajo philosophy, or view of life; resilience (middle range theory); the Family Stress Theory; and the Resiliency Mode of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation. Resilience was used as the over arching conceptual perspective for the study. A Grounded Theory of Navajo Parenting emerged from the data. Key categories to support the emerging theory were identified. The core category was Versatility through Transcendence. The supporting categories were: Strategies for Managing Challenges; Transcendence in Parenting; Intergenerational Alcohol Abuse, Violence and Suffering; and Knowledge/Acquisition of Needs. The families described their stories of transcendence through substance abuse, suffering, and violence to be able to parent their children who were living with the primary and secondary challenges of prenatal alcohol exposures. Further research is needed to test and expand this emerging theory of Navajo parenting of children with FAS/FAE. The challenges that were related to FAS/FAE were more easily managed with patterns of resilience within the families. Factors that influenced family's abilities to parent will be disseminated to assist other families who are managing the problems associated with FAS/FAE.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nursing.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glittenberg, JoAnn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNavajo children and families living with fetal alcohol syndrome/fetal alcohol effectsen_US
dc.creatorBeckett, Cynthia Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeckett, Cynthia Dianeen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the study was to develop a culturally sensitive Grounded Theory of Navajo parenting for families who are living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)/Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE). The research question was: What are the social and cultural factors and processes that Navajo families use to mange care for a child with FAS/FAE? The philosophical perspectives that guided the study were: the Navajo philosophy, or view of life; resilience (middle range theory); the Family Stress Theory; and the Resiliency Mode of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation. Resilience was used as the over arching conceptual perspective for the study. A Grounded Theory of Navajo Parenting emerged from the data. Key categories to support the emerging theory were identified. The core category was Versatility through Transcendence. The supporting categories were: Strategies for Managing Challenges; Transcendence in Parenting; Intergenerational Alcohol Abuse, Violence and Suffering; and Knowledge/Acquisition of Needs. The families described their stories of transcendence through substance abuse, suffering, and violence to be able to parent their children who were living with the primary and secondary challenges of prenatal alcohol exposures. Further research is needed to test and expand this emerging theory of Navajo parenting of children with FAS/FAE. The challenges that were related to FAS/FAE were more easily managed with patterns of resilience within the families. Factors that influenced family's abilities to parent will be disseminated to assist other families who are managing the problems associated with FAS/FAE.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGlittenberg, JoAnnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073191en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43426906en_US
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