Effectiveness of clinical practice guidelines for treating asthma in the Department of Defense: A comparison of clinical and economic outcomes between the Army, Air Force, and Navy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280138
Title:
Effectiveness of clinical practice guidelines for treating asthma in the Department of Defense: A comparison of clinical and economic outcomes between the Army, Air Force, and Navy
Author:
Bennett, David M.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this research was to evaluate the strategy of the military health service (MHS) to improve asthma outcomes through the use of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Outcomes were evaluated at the patient level and included inpatient/outpatient visits, prescriptions dispensed, number of exacerbations, number of beddays and direct cost of therapy. In addition, provider compliance to CPG recommendations was evaluated by measuring the proportion of subjects dispensed long-acting controller medications. A nonrandomized control-group before-after design with retrospective matched-pair DoD data was used for this research. The intervention used in this research was the formal asthma CPG-use process implemented by the Army in September of 2000. Compared to baseline measures, all outcomes improved significantly (p < 0.05) in the after period for both the subjects exposed, and not exposed, to the CPG-use process. Other than the improvement noted in the number of asthma exacerbations, which was greater in the exposed group than the non-exposed group (p < 0.001), there was no other difference between groups in the amount that outcomes improved. The proportion of subjects prescribed long-term controller medications increased significantly for subjects exposed to the CPG-use process (0.30 to 0.66, p < 0.001), and for those not exposed to the CPG-use process (0.30 to 0.66, p < 0.001). Although the findings of this research suggested that a formal CPG-use process to standardize asthma therapy was associated with decreased costs, this was not supported by results regarding the clinical outcomes. To further evaluate the effect of asthma CPGs on economic and clinical outcomes, additional research is needed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Pharmacy.; Health Sciences, Public Health.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Pharmacy Practice and Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Malone, Daniel C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of clinical practice guidelines for treating asthma in the Department of Defense: A comparison of clinical and economic outcomes between the Army, Air Force, and Navyen_US
dc.creatorBennett, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBennett, David M.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to evaluate the strategy of the military health service (MHS) to improve asthma outcomes through the use of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Outcomes were evaluated at the patient level and included inpatient/outpatient visits, prescriptions dispensed, number of exacerbations, number of beddays and direct cost of therapy. In addition, provider compliance to CPG recommendations was evaluated by measuring the proportion of subjects dispensed long-acting controller medications. A nonrandomized control-group before-after design with retrospective matched-pair DoD data was used for this research. The intervention used in this research was the formal asthma CPG-use process implemented by the Army in September of 2000. Compared to baseline measures, all outcomes improved significantly (p < 0.05) in the after period for both the subjects exposed, and not exposed, to the CPG-use process. Other than the improvement noted in the number of asthma exacerbations, which was greater in the exposed group than the non-exposed group (p < 0.001), there was no other difference between groups in the amount that outcomes improved. The proportion of subjects prescribed long-term controller medications increased significantly for subjects exposed to the CPG-use process (0.30 to 0.66, p < 0.001), and for those not exposed to the CPG-use process (0.30 to 0.66, p < 0.001). Although the findings of this research suggested that a formal CPG-use process to standardize asthma therapy was associated with decreased costs, this was not supported by results regarding the clinical outcomes. To further evaluate the effect of asthma CPGs on economic and clinical outcomes, additional research is needed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Pharmacy.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmacy Practice and Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMalone, Daniel C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3061022en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43042727en_US
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