Organizational change in the Arizona funeral home industry,1968-1999: Density, concentration, and vital rates in a measured resource space

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280134
Title:
Organizational change in the Arizona funeral home industry,1968-1999: Density, concentration, and vital rates in a measured resource space
Author:
Breckenridge, Robert S.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation, I examine organizational density and ownership relations in the Funeral Home Industry in the state of Arizona between 1968 and 1999. I incorporate the theories of organizational ecology and resource dependence alongside institutional theory to analyze changing numbers and concentrations of organizations. In pursuit of this research, I distinguish between establishments, the actual funeral home storefront building operation, and firms, the organizations that own and manage one or more establishments. Focus is placed on two particular institutions in the funeral home industry: (1) the tight social linkage between the industry and human deaths, and (2) the traditions that limited growth among funeral home organizations. I use these institutional forces along with the size of the resource space and organizational variables to examine competition and concentration as forces affecting the numbers, relationships, and vital rates of organizations via time-series cross-sectional methods. My findings indicate that hyper-legitimacy of the industry relative to resources plays a key role in population change by promoting organizational growth under conditions of a growing resources space, leading to economies of scale. In general, my results show that establishments develop in localized competitive markets in manners compatible with theories of density and resource dependence; and firms operate at the aggregated state level---across multiple county markets---in manners compatible with the theories of resource partitioning.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geography.; Sociology, Social Structure and Development.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Breiger, Ronald L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOrganizational change in the Arizona funeral home industry,1968-1999: Density, concentration, and vital rates in a measured resource spaceen_US
dc.creatorBreckenridge, Robert S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBreckenridge, Robert S.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I examine organizational density and ownership relations in the Funeral Home Industry in the state of Arizona between 1968 and 1999. I incorporate the theories of organizational ecology and resource dependence alongside institutional theory to analyze changing numbers and concentrations of organizations. In pursuit of this research, I distinguish between establishments, the actual funeral home storefront building operation, and firms, the organizations that own and manage one or more establishments. Focus is placed on two particular institutions in the funeral home industry: (1) the tight social linkage between the industry and human deaths, and (2) the traditions that limited growth among funeral home organizations. I use these institutional forces along with the size of the resource space and organizational variables to examine competition and concentration as forces affecting the numbers, relationships, and vital rates of organizations via time-series cross-sectional methods. My findings indicate that hyper-legitimacy of the industry relative to resources plays a key role in population change by promoting organizational growth under conditions of a growing resources space, leading to economies of scale. In general, my results show that establishments develop in localized competitive markets in manners compatible with theories of density and resource dependence; and firms operate at the aggregated state level---across multiple county markets---in manners compatible with the theories of resource partitioning.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Social Structure and Development.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBreiger, Ronald L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3061017en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43042661en_US
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