Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280133
Title:
Worldviews and health care choices among people with chronic pain
Author:
Buck, Ernestina S.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine whether or not there was a relationship between the worldviews of people with chronic pain and the health care choices that they make. The background of the study included evidence of a cultural shift toward integration of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with conventional health care practices. The justification for the study was established with regard to previous research indicating that people with chronic health conditions, demographic predictors, and philosophical differences might contribute to characteristics associated with CAM use. In the literature review, two premises were established: (1) that healing is the psychophysiological response to underlying beliefs, and (2) that Pepper's worldviews (Pepper, 1942) characterize beliefs and expectancies underlying cognitive processes. The study involved a survey packet mailed to prospective subjects who were clients at a traditional teaching hospital clinic specializing in pain management. The survey packet included a list of demographic characteristics, the Health Care Choice List, and the World Hypotheses Scale as measurement of Pepperian worldviews. The data were analyzed by using multiple linear regression, correlation coefficients, and Chi-square Crosstabs procedure. Overall, results of the present study indicated that the combination of age and formistic (categorical) worldview were statistically significant predictors of conventional health care choices by participants in this study. Subjects who were older were less likely to use CAM; and subjects who identified with formism as a dominant worldview were less likely to use CAM. Although formistic worldview was the only statistically significant predictor of health care choices among the worldview categories, there were directional trends of health care choices in relation to worldviews. Subjects endorsing formistic (categorical) and mechanistic (cause and effect) worldviews were more likely to use conventional methods, and subjects with contextualistic (cause and effect relative to context), organismic (interactive whole) worldviews, and equal scores in two worldview categories, were more likely to use CAM methods.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sales, Amos

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWorldviews and health care choices among people with chronic painen_US
dc.creatorBuck, Ernestina S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBuck, Ernestina S.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine whether or not there was a relationship between the worldviews of people with chronic pain and the health care choices that they make. The background of the study included evidence of a cultural shift toward integration of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with conventional health care practices. The justification for the study was established with regard to previous research indicating that people with chronic health conditions, demographic predictors, and philosophical differences might contribute to characteristics associated with CAM use. In the literature review, two premises were established: (1) that healing is the psychophysiological response to underlying beliefs, and (2) that Pepper's worldviews (Pepper, 1942) characterize beliefs and expectancies underlying cognitive processes. The study involved a survey packet mailed to prospective subjects who were clients at a traditional teaching hospital clinic specializing in pain management. The survey packet included a list of demographic characteristics, the Health Care Choice List, and the World Hypotheses Scale as measurement of Pepperian worldviews. The data were analyzed by using multiple linear regression, correlation coefficients, and Chi-square Crosstabs procedure. Overall, results of the present study indicated that the combination of age and formistic (categorical) worldview were statistically significant predictors of conventional health care choices by participants in this study. Subjects who were older were less likely to use CAM; and subjects who identified with formism as a dominant worldview were less likely to use CAM. Although formistic worldview was the only statistically significant predictor of health care choices among the worldview categories, there were directional trends of health care choices in relation to worldviews. Subjects endorsing formistic (categorical) and mechanistic (cause and effect) worldviews were more likely to use conventional methods, and subjects with contextualistic (cause and effect relative to context), organismic (interactive whole) worldviews, and equal scores in two worldview categories, were more likely to use CAM methods.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSales, Amosen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3061016en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4304265xen_US
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