High school teachers' knowledge of legal parameters regarding church/state issues

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280132
Title:
High school teachers' knowledge of legal parameters regarding church/state issues
Author:
Campbell, Jeffery R.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study considered the nature of a disconnect that appears to exist between high school teachers' understanding of church/state legal parameters and actual church/state legal parameters in the public school context. A survey was given to the 175 high school teachers in a Southwestern high school district. 115 teachers (approximately 66%) from each of the two high schools in the district responded. The survey described thirty-three church/state scenarios in the public school context and teachers were asked to indicate whether they thought scenarios characterized situations that were constitutionally appropriate, constitutionally inappropriate, or whether they didn't know. It was concluded that respondents in this sample had considerable misperceptions about church/state legal parameters. Rather than disclosing what specific topics were least and most understood, it was found that teachers classified scenarios sometimes correctly and sometimes incorrectly within the same topic area. Consideration of these findings in light of communications theory, particularly as it pertains to theories of Supreme Court influence, suggests that teachers' knowledge of church/state legal parameters could be more accurately described as a set of cognitive heuristics (rules of thumb), as opposed to a deep understanding of case law. Narrative responses and analysis of specific church/state topic areas also lent credence to this conclusion. Potential kinds of heuristics emerging in the data were also considered. Implications for teacher training teachers were discussed. Areas for future research were suggested.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Religion, General.; Law.; Education, Secondary.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Teaching and Teacher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Luft, Julie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHigh school teachers' knowledge of legal parameters regarding church/state issuesen_US
dc.creatorCampbell, Jeffery R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Jeffery R.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study considered the nature of a disconnect that appears to exist between high school teachers' understanding of church/state legal parameters and actual church/state legal parameters in the public school context. A survey was given to the 175 high school teachers in a Southwestern high school district. 115 teachers (approximately 66%) from each of the two high schools in the district responded. The survey described thirty-three church/state scenarios in the public school context and teachers were asked to indicate whether they thought scenarios characterized situations that were constitutionally appropriate, constitutionally inappropriate, or whether they didn't know. It was concluded that respondents in this sample had considerable misperceptions about church/state legal parameters. Rather than disclosing what specific topics were least and most understood, it was found that teachers classified scenarios sometimes correctly and sometimes incorrectly within the same topic area. Consideration of these findings in light of communications theory, particularly as it pertains to theories of Supreme Court influence, suggests that teachers' knowledge of church/state legal parameters could be more accurately described as a set of cognitive heuristics (rules of thumb), as opposed to a deep understanding of case law. Narrative responses and analysis of specific church/state topic areas also lent credence to this conclusion. Potential kinds of heuristics emerging in the data were also considered. Implications for teacher training teachers were discussed. Areas for future research were suggested.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectReligion, General.en_US
dc.subjectLaw.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLuft, Julieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3061015en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43042636en_US
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