An investigation of stress, self-efficacy, and social support as predictors of smoking status for postpartum women

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280116
Title:
An investigation of stress, self-efficacy, and social support as predictors of smoking status for postpartum women
Author:
Hingtgen, Marla
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The basis for the present research stems from concerns for women who smoke after they deliver their infants. This becomes especially relevant when behaviors that affect the woman's health and the health of her infant are jeopardized. Based on the tenets of Bandura's social-cognitive theory, factors associated with cigarette smoking for this population emerge. Self-efficacy theory, a major component of social-cognitive behavior, supports the contention that self-efficacy is a major component to self-regulation of one's behavior and applicable to smoking cessation for women in the postpartum period. For this study, a cognitive-behavioral model of smoking status was developed in order to examine the role of self-efficacy in the smoking process. Stress and social support, known to be associated with levels of self-efficacy, have been included in the model to understand their relationship to postpartum women and smoking status. Data for this analysis was obtained from a follow-up study of 103 of the 385 eligible women who were one year or more postpartum and who were previously enrolled in a randomized clinical trial known as the Perinatal Education Program (PEP, N = 469). As proposed by the model, results indicate remote from delivery time (12 months or more postpartum), self-efficacy is a mediating factor in the stress smoking relationship. However, social support was not found to moderate self-efficacy and the smoking relationship. As a whole, when comparing women who currently smoke and women who quit or never smoke, higher stress, lower number of supportive individuals, and a partner who smokes were significantly related to a woman's increased likelihood to be a smoker.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kelly, Maureen E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn investigation of stress, self-efficacy, and social support as predictors of smoking status for postpartum womenen_US
dc.creatorHingtgen, Marlaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHingtgen, Marlaen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe basis for the present research stems from concerns for women who smoke after they deliver their infants. This becomes especially relevant when behaviors that affect the woman's health and the health of her infant are jeopardized. Based on the tenets of Bandura's social-cognitive theory, factors associated with cigarette smoking for this population emerge. Self-efficacy theory, a major component of social-cognitive behavior, supports the contention that self-efficacy is a major component to self-regulation of one's behavior and applicable to smoking cessation for women in the postpartum period. For this study, a cognitive-behavioral model of smoking status was developed in order to examine the role of self-efficacy in the smoking process. Stress and social support, known to be associated with levels of self-efficacy, have been included in the model to understand their relationship to postpartum women and smoking status. Data for this analysis was obtained from a follow-up study of 103 of the 385 eligible women who were one year or more postpartum and who were previously enrolled in a randomized clinical trial known as the Perinatal Education Program (PEP, N = 469). As proposed by the model, results indicate remote from delivery time (12 months or more postpartum), self-efficacy is a mediating factor in the stress smoking relationship. However, social support was not found to moderate self-efficacy and the smoking relationship. As a whole, when comparing women who currently smoke and women who quit or never smoke, higher stress, lower number of supportive individuals, and a partner who smokes were significantly related to a woman's increased likelihood to be a smoker.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKelly, Maureen E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3060997en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43042181en_US
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