Translation of the health brochure and impact on the target reader: A contrastive analysis of the structural and pragmatic features of texts translated into Spanish versus texts written originally in Spanish

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280112
Title:
Translation of the health brochure and impact on the target reader: A contrastive analysis of the structural and pragmatic features of texts translated into Spanish versus texts written originally in Spanish
Author:
Jacobson, Holly E.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study involved the analysis of a corpus of health brochures in Spanish, contrasting the way this particular genre is formed and understood in the United States and Mexico. The corpus is made up of two subcorpora: a collection of health brochures published in the United States (translated from English into Spanish), and a collection of brochures from Mexico (written originally in Spanish). These subcorpora were analyzed and compared from many different angles, providing a comprehensive view of how the texts are structured and organized. Analysis at the microlinguistic level, grounded in Speech Act Theory, shows differences in the linguistic realization of the persuasive interactional goals in the two text types. At the macrolinguistic level, a factor analysis reveals differences between the two text types in terms of the patterning and co-occurrence of linguistic features serving the overall informational and persuasive functions characteristic of the health brochure. These differences are attributed to the interpersonal relations and cultural and social contexts in which the two text types are embedded. A subset of texts from both subcorpora was field tested with the aim of assessing the impact of the two text types on readers, in addition to readers' perceptions of the texts. Fifty-four Spanish-speaking adults from Mexico participated in this part of the study. Field testing involved a three pronged approach: a pretest-posttest protocol, recall protocol, and interviews. Responses provide a look at the brochures from the perspective of the reader, and shed light on the role of the two text types in the Mexican community. Results of both parts of this study contribute to the fields of translation studies, translator training, contrastive rhetoric, corpus linguistics, genre analysis, cross-cultural communication, and health education and communication.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Linguistics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Second Language Acquisition and Teaching
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Saville-Troike, Muriel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTranslation of the health brochure and impact on the target reader: A contrastive analysis of the structural and pragmatic features of texts translated into Spanish versus texts written originally in Spanishen_US
dc.creatorJacobson, Holly E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJacobson, Holly E.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study involved the analysis of a corpus of health brochures in Spanish, contrasting the way this particular genre is formed and understood in the United States and Mexico. The corpus is made up of two subcorpora: a collection of health brochures published in the United States (translated from English into Spanish), and a collection of brochures from Mexico (written originally in Spanish). These subcorpora were analyzed and compared from many different angles, providing a comprehensive view of how the texts are structured and organized. Analysis at the microlinguistic level, grounded in Speech Act Theory, shows differences in the linguistic realization of the persuasive interactional goals in the two text types. At the macrolinguistic level, a factor analysis reveals differences between the two text types in terms of the patterning and co-occurrence of linguistic features serving the overall informational and persuasive functions characteristic of the health brochure. These differences are attributed to the interpersonal relations and cultural and social contexts in which the two text types are embedded. A subset of texts from both subcorpora was field tested with the aim of assessing the impact of the two text types on readers, in addition to readers' perceptions of the texts. Fifty-four Spanish-speaking adults from Mexico participated in this part of the study. Field testing involved a three pronged approach: a pretest-posttest protocol, recall protocol, and interviews. Responses provide a look at the brochures from the perspective of the reader, and shed light on the role of the two text types in the Mexican community. Results of both parts of this study contribute to the fields of translation studies, translator training, contrastive rhetoric, corpus linguistics, genre analysis, cross-cultural communication, and health education and communication.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition and Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSaville-Troike, Murielen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3060993en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43042144en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.