Learning and memory in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana: New behavioral paradigms for associative learning

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280108
Title:
Learning and memory in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana: New behavioral paradigms for associative learning
Author:
Kwon, Hyung-Wook
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although there is much information about insect associative learning, less is known about the underlying neural mechanisms. This is partly due to the lack of behavioral paradigms providing a suitable model for studying learning mechanisms at the level of individual neurons. This thesis describes the background to, and the demonstration of, two associative learning paradigms: visual associative learning and spatial learning. Both have been developed on the restrained cockroach so that later these methods can be employed in conjunction with electrophysiology. By projecting their antennae intermittently towards a position of potential food sources, cockroaches sample salient information. Here, this antennal behavior, called an "antennal projection response (APR)," is used to demonstrate long-term memory where an APR is elicited by a conditioning stimulus (CS: green light) paired with a spatially coincident odor (unconditioned stimulus: US). The acquired APR to the green light cue persists for up to 72 hours. Spatial learning is also a vitally important behavior in most animals that must remember locations of food and landmarks and that must navigate. Spatial learning abilities were here tested by observing APRs towards a cue, where the cockroach learns the position of a visual cue (CS) associated with a food odor (US), relative to the position of another visual stimulus in the contralateral visual field (the contralateral visual reference stimulus: ConRS). Memory of positional information, tested by altering the relative positions of the CS and ConRS, was investigated. Cockroaches showed significant APRs to visual cues not only when a position of the visual cue and spatial reference cue were exactly matched during training trials, but also during tests when the relative angles between the visual cue and spatial reference cue were matched but rotated around the head's vertical axis. When these angles were not the same as the angle used for training, the CS was not recognized. These results suggest that cockroaches employ two different mechanisms to find a food source: retinotopic matching and recognition of angular relationships between a source and landmark. The application of these paradigms to studies that could investigate possible neural mechanisms of these behaviors is discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Neuroscience.; Biology, Entomology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Entomology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Strausfeld, Nicholas J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLearning and memory in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana: New behavioral paradigms for associative learningen_US
dc.creatorKwon, Hyung-Wooken_US
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Hyung-Wooken_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough there is much information about insect associative learning, less is known about the underlying neural mechanisms. This is partly due to the lack of behavioral paradigms providing a suitable model for studying learning mechanisms at the level of individual neurons. This thesis describes the background to, and the demonstration of, two associative learning paradigms: visual associative learning and spatial learning. Both have been developed on the restrained cockroach so that later these methods can be employed in conjunction with electrophysiology. By projecting their antennae intermittently towards a position of potential food sources, cockroaches sample salient information. Here, this antennal behavior, called an "antennal projection response (APR)," is used to demonstrate long-term memory where an APR is elicited by a conditioning stimulus (CS: green light) paired with a spatially coincident odor (unconditioned stimulus: US). The acquired APR to the green light cue persists for up to 72 hours. Spatial learning is also a vitally important behavior in most animals that must remember locations of food and landmarks and that must navigate. Spatial learning abilities were here tested by observing APRs towards a cue, where the cockroach learns the position of a visual cue (CS) associated with a food odor (US), relative to the position of another visual stimulus in the contralateral visual field (the contralateral visual reference stimulus: ConRS). Memory of positional information, tested by altering the relative positions of the CS and ConRS, was investigated. Cockroaches showed significant APRs to visual cues not only when a position of the visual cue and spatial reference cue were exactly matched during training trials, but also during tests when the relative angles between the visual cue and spatial reference cue were matched but rotated around the head's vertical axis. When these angles were not the same as the angle used for training, the CS was not recognized. These results suggest that cockroaches employ two different mechanisms to find a food source: retinotopic matching and recognition of angular relationships between a source and landmark. The application of these paradigms to studies that could investigate possible neural mechanisms of these behaviors is discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Neuroscience.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStrausfeld, Nicholas J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3060983en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43041991en_US
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