The role of expectancies in smoking behavior in middle school and high school: An adaptation and extension of the theory of planned behavior

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280096
Title:
The role of expectancies in smoking behavior in middle school and high school: An adaptation and extension of the theory of planned behavior
Author:
Peecksen, David
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study focuses on the utility of the expectancy construct in the prediction of adolescent cigarette smoking within the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991), based on recommendations by Marlatt (1985). Specifically, positive and negative smoking expectancies were hypothesized to moderate the relationships of social norms and self-efficacy with smoking intentions and, and for self-efficacy only, smoking behavior. Factor analysis assessed the discriminant validity of the measures. Using multiple regression analyses, cross-sectional, self-report questionnaire data from 25,868 sixth through twelfth grade students were used to test the hypotheses. Consistent support was found for the additive effects predicting intentions to smoke and daily smoking. For the interactive effects, moderate support was found predicting intentions, but not daily smoking. Likewise, moderate support was found for school level and smoking status differences in these relationships. These findings are discussed in terms of their theoretical and prevention implications regarding the role and etiology of expectancies within the theory of planned behavior, social cognitive theory, and previous conceptualizations of risk and protective interactive effects.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Health Sciences, Public Health.; Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Maggs, Jennifer

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe role of expectancies in smoking behavior in middle school and high school: An adaptation and extension of the theory of planned behavioren_US
dc.creatorPeecksen, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorPeecksen, Daviden_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study focuses on the utility of the expectancy construct in the prediction of adolescent cigarette smoking within the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991), based on recommendations by Marlatt (1985). Specifically, positive and negative smoking expectancies were hypothesized to moderate the relationships of social norms and self-efficacy with smoking intentions and, and for self-efficacy only, smoking behavior. Factor analysis assessed the discriminant validity of the measures. Using multiple regression analyses, cross-sectional, self-report questionnaire data from 25,868 sixth through twelfth grade students were used to test the hypotheses. Consistent support was found for the additive effects predicting intentions to smoke and daily smoking. For the interactive effects, moderate support was found predicting intentions, but not daily smoking. Likewise, moderate support was found for school level and smoking status differences in these relationships. These findings are discussed in terms of their theoretical and prevention implications regarding the role and etiology of expectancies within the theory of planned behavior, social cognitive theory, and previous conceptualizations of risk and protective interactive effects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMaggs, Jenniferen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3060968en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43038438en_US
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