People's responses in a time of crisis: Marginalization in the upper Gulf of California

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280024
Title:
People's responses in a time of crisis: Marginalization in the upper Gulf of California
Author:
Valdez-Gardea, Gloria
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation explores the creative ways in which particular individuals and the community in general, responds to economic crisis and perceived marginality. It shows how residents of El Golfo de Santa Clara, a small community in the upper Gulf of California, with their meager incomes, fuller utilization of kinship and other social sources, participation in illegal and informal activities, migration, and political participation, are contesting their marginality and resisting the social and economic outcome of state policies in the area. Residents' feeling of frustration and disempowerment increased during the early 1990s. Because of ecological changes and structural adjustment policies the shrimp industry in the Gulf of California collapsed. Household salaries dropped drastically; fishermen were unemployed and families had to look for different strategies to survive. In the midst of the economic crisis residents of El Golfo were told of the decree of a biosphere reserve, which initially had the objective of restricting fishing activity in the area. People's responses involved individual and collective performances and discursive critiques of state authority as represented by the management team of the biosphere reserve. Residents pressed their rights to get involved in the management of the area as well as their rights to get infrastructural services for the town. People's responses show that marginality and poverty had nothing to do with a 'natural' or 'biological' condition, as presented by some earlier anthropological studies of the Mexican countryside, but with a historical economic inequality and the distribution of wealth within the country. The peoples' responses to their economic and political situation underline a critique to their perceived identity as a "rural community" by the managers of the biosphere reserve and authorities that categorized rural people as backward, isolated, uncivilized, and unimportant in the larger social formation. These local responses to the political and economic context suggest that anthropologists should take a more engaged approach in the study of the Mexican countryside.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Anthropology, Cultural.; Women's Studies.; Economics, Agricultural.; Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McGuire, Thomas R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePeople's responses in a time of crisis: Marginalization in the upper Gulf of Californiaen_US
dc.creatorValdez-Gardea, Gloriaen_US
dc.contributor.authorValdez-Gardea, Gloriaen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the creative ways in which particular individuals and the community in general, responds to economic crisis and perceived marginality. It shows how residents of El Golfo de Santa Clara, a small community in the upper Gulf of California, with their meager incomes, fuller utilization of kinship and other social sources, participation in illegal and informal activities, migration, and political participation, are contesting their marginality and resisting the social and economic outcome of state policies in the area. Residents' feeling of frustration and disempowerment increased during the early 1990s. Because of ecological changes and structural adjustment policies the shrimp industry in the Gulf of California collapsed. Household salaries dropped drastically; fishermen were unemployed and families had to look for different strategies to survive. In the midst of the economic crisis residents of El Golfo were told of the decree of a biosphere reserve, which initially had the objective of restricting fishing activity in the area. People's responses involved individual and collective performances and discursive critiques of state authority as represented by the management team of the biosphere reserve. Residents pressed their rights to get involved in the management of the area as well as their rights to get infrastructural services for the town. People's responses show that marginality and poverty had nothing to do with a 'natural' or 'biological' condition, as presented by some earlier anthropological studies of the Mexican countryside, but with a historical economic inequality and the distribution of wealth within the country. The peoples' responses to their economic and political situation underline a critique to their perceived identity as a "rural community" by the managers of the biosphere reserve and authorities that categorized rural people as backward, isolated, uncivilized, and unimportant in the larger social formation. These local responses to the political and economic context suggest that anthropologists should take a more engaged approach in the study of the Mexican countryside.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Agricultural.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcGuire, Thomas R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3053891en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42813128en_US
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