In nahui ollin, a cycle of four indigenous movements: Mexican Indian rights, oral traditions, sexualities, and new media

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/280008
Title:
In nahui ollin, a cycle of four indigenous movements: Mexican Indian rights, oral traditions, sexualities, and new media
Author:
Estrada, Gabriel S.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Pre-existing more hegemonic theories of Cultural Studies, Hispanic Studies, Media Arts, and Queer Studies, Nahuatl cosmologies offers an evolving political grounding for Native scholars. A Nahuatl cosmology of four directions represents a circle of masculinity, elders, femininity, and youth and forms the epistemology by which one can view Nahuatl and Xicana/o culture. In the east, Indigenous Rights directly relate to the hegemonic oppressions such as war, prison, and heterosexism that many Indigenous men face. Indigenous peoples fight those hegemonies with international legal concepts and through expressing their different epistemologies. In the north, the Caxcan oral tradition of my family contrasts with the homophobic and genocidal narratives more common in Chicano histories. I show how contemporary writers can rely more upon oral traditions and revisions to colonial records for their historical treatments of Indigenous peoples. To the west, postmodernism and feminism offer partial but incomplete analysis of Nahuatl cultures that Nahuatl women articulate in their own literatures and cosmological relations. In particular, Leslie Silko's stories are more than capable of critiquing postmodernism and ethnography, including those that describe Raramuri peoples. To the south, I demonstrate that gay Nahuatl and Xicano men can embody the social Malinche in keeping with Nahuatl beliefs. I use the idea of the gay social Malinche to critique Troyano's film, Latin Boys Go to Hell. Alternative internet sources tend to facilitate the ideas of the Social Malinche more. Together, all four movements comprise ollin, a social and cosmic movement that embraces different sexualities and generational changes in evolving aspects of dynamic social movements. Interweaving Western thought into the basic cosmology of Indigenous peoples, two-spirit social Malinches can open a path to political and social movement to improve their various relations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Literature, Comparative.; Anthropology, Cultural.; Literature, American.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.; Cinema.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Babcock, Barbara

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIn nahui ollin, a cycle of four indigenous movements: Mexican Indian rights, oral traditions, sexualities, and new mediaen_US
dc.creatorEstrada, Gabriel S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEstrada, Gabriel S.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPre-existing more hegemonic theories of Cultural Studies, Hispanic Studies, Media Arts, and Queer Studies, Nahuatl cosmologies offers an evolving political grounding for Native scholars. A Nahuatl cosmology of four directions represents a circle of masculinity, elders, femininity, and youth and forms the epistemology by which one can view Nahuatl and Xicana/o culture. In the east, Indigenous Rights directly relate to the hegemonic oppressions such as war, prison, and heterosexism that many Indigenous men face. Indigenous peoples fight those hegemonies with international legal concepts and through expressing their different epistemologies. In the north, the Caxcan oral tradition of my family contrasts with the homophobic and genocidal narratives more common in Chicano histories. I show how contemporary writers can rely more upon oral traditions and revisions to colonial records for their historical treatments of Indigenous peoples. To the west, postmodernism and feminism offer partial but incomplete analysis of Nahuatl cultures that Nahuatl women articulate in their own literatures and cosmological relations. In particular, Leslie Silko's stories are more than capable of critiquing postmodernism and ethnography, including those that describe Raramuri peoples. To the south, I demonstrate that gay Nahuatl and Xicano men can embody the social Malinche in keeping with Nahuatl beliefs. I use the idea of the gay social Malinche to critique Troyano's film, Latin Boys Go to Hell. Alternative internet sources tend to facilitate the ideas of the Social Malinche more. Together, all four movements comprise ollin, a social and cosmic movement that embraces different sexualities and generational changes in evolving aspects of dynamic social movements. Interweaving Western thought into the basic cosmology of Indigenous peoples, two-spirit social Malinches can open a path to political and social movement to improve their various relations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, Comparative.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, American.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.subjectCinema.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural and Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBabcock, Barbaraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3053872en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42811727en_US
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