Three versions of the Concerto for Oboe and Small Orchestra (1945-1946, revised 1948) by Richard Strauss: An analytical and historical study for the performer

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279996
Title:
Three versions of the Concerto for Oboe and Small Orchestra (1945-1946, revised 1948) by Richard Strauss: An analytical and historical study for the performer
Author:
Binkley, Linda
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Richard Strauss's Concerto for Oboe and Small Orchestra (1945-46, revised 1948) is one of the most challenging works in the oboist's repertoire. It requires a high level of musical artistry, great technical command of the instrument, and disciplined use of breath control in order to achieve a successful performance. The intent of this study is to provide all oboists, from the student encountering Strauss's Oboe Concerto for the first time to the seasoned professional looking for new inspiration, with concise and relevant information that will enrich his or her experience in rehearsing and performing the work. Historical details are briefly discussed, including the meeting between John de Lancie and Richard Strauss that resulted in the writing of the oboe concerto. A comparison between the first (1946) and second (1948) printings of the work, including a comparative analysis of the different endings, and a thorough discussion of their revisions done by John de Lancie (1987) offers further insight into various stylistic concerns inherent to the performance of the work. Finally, a comprehensive study of the endurance issues, orchestration, related stylistic aspects, and harmonic analysis designed for performers concludes the study.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Music.
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tatman, Neil

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThree versions of the Concerto for Oboe and Small Orchestra (1945-1946, revised 1948) by Richard Strauss: An analytical and historical study for the performeren_US
dc.creatorBinkley, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBinkley, Lindaen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRichard Strauss's Concerto for Oboe and Small Orchestra (1945-46, revised 1948) is one of the most challenging works in the oboist's repertoire. It requires a high level of musical artistry, great technical command of the instrument, and disciplined use of breath control in order to achieve a successful performance. The intent of this study is to provide all oboists, from the student encountering Strauss's Oboe Concerto for the first time to the seasoned professional looking for new inspiration, with concise and relevant information that will enrich his or her experience in rehearsing and performing the work. Historical details are briefly discussed, including the meeting between John de Lancie and Richard Strauss that resulted in the writing of the oboe concerto. A comparison between the first (1946) and second (1948) printings of the work, including a comparative analysis of the different endings, and a thorough discussion of their revisions done by John de Lancie (1987) offers further insight into various stylistic concerns inherent to the performance of the work. Finally, a comprehensive study of the endurance issues, orchestration, related stylistic aspects, and harmonic analysis designed for performers concludes the study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTatman, Neilen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3053862en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42811478en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.