Benjamin Britten's Nocturnal, Op. 70 for guitar: A novel approach to program music and variation structure

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279989
Title:
Benjamin Britten's Nocturnal, Op. 70 for guitar: A novel approach to program music and variation structure
Author:
Alcaraz, Roberto
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This document is a study of Benjamin Britten's Nocturnal, Op. 70, a major work composed for solo guitar in 1963. It intends to demonstrate that the architecture used by the composer in this work is determined as much by its underlying program as well as to the variation structure used to convey it. This work is structured in eight sections: following an overview of the document in section one, section two consists of a brief biography of the composer as well as a general survey of his works, including those in which he makes use of the guitar. Sections three and four examine the works by Britten composed in variation form, as well as those which are related to the themes of night, death, sleep, and dreams. Sections five and six include a brief biography of Renaissance composer John Dowland, as well as a brief discussion of other Britten works inspired by the music of this composer. Benjamin Britten uses John Dowland's song "Come Heavy Sleep" as the basis for his Nocturnal, Op. 70. This song is examined and analyzed as part of section six. Section seven consists of a close examination of the Nocturnal, Op. 70. This examination looks closely at the most important harmonic, rhythmic, and formal elements of each variation and how they relate to the theme of Dowland. Finally, the conclusion sums up and reemphasizes the main thesis laid out in the introduction of this document.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Music.
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Patterson, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBenjamin Britten's Nocturnal, Op. 70 for guitar: A novel approach to program music and variation structureen_US
dc.creatorAlcaraz, Robertoen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlcaraz, Robertoen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis document is a study of Benjamin Britten's Nocturnal, Op. 70, a major work composed for solo guitar in 1963. It intends to demonstrate that the architecture used by the composer in this work is determined as much by its underlying program as well as to the variation structure used to convey it. This work is structured in eight sections: following an overview of the document in section one, section two consists of a brief biography of the composer as well as a general survey of his works, including those in which he makes use of the guitar. Sections three and four examine the works by Britten composed in variation form, as well as those which are related to the themes of night, death, sleep, and dreams. Sections five and six include a brief biography of Renaissance composer John Dowland, as well as a brief discussion of other Britten works inspired by the music of this composer. Benjamin Britten uses John Dowland's song "Come Heavy Sleep" as the basis for his Nocturnal, Op. 70. This song is examined and analyzed as part of section six. Section seven consists of a close examination of the Nocturnal, Op. 70. This examination looks closely at the most important harmonic, rhythmic, and formal elements of each variation and how they relate to the theme of Dowland. Finally, the conclusion sums up and reemphasizes the main thesis laid out in the introduction of this document.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPatterson, Thomasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3050364en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42729919en_US
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