From the stage to the coffeehouse to the drawing room: Conversation in eighteenth-century England

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279984
Title:
From the stage to the coffeehouse to the drawing room: Conversation in eighteenth-century England
Author:
Prineas, Sarah
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines the history of conversation in eighteenth-century England by looking at normative sites of discourse, beginning with the comedies of the Restoration stage, moving on to the coffeehouses, the polite drawing rooms, and ending with an examination of the Bluestocking circle. Of particular interest is the role of women as conversation moves along a trajectory from the eloquence of the Renaissance period to a more rational style associated with the emerging middle class, to the polite conversation that allowed women a place in discourse. Early in the period, women were expected to remain silent--and thus chaste--when in company, but as the century progressed and it became clear that women's public roles were expanding, the mode of public discourse shifted, from eloquence to politeness. At the same time, the normative sites of discourse shifted as well, from the coffeehouse, in which the man aware of his civic duty engaged in rational debates on subjects of public import, to the more private drawing rooms, sites presided over by women and made polite by their presence. The conversation, as well, became less concerned with public issues such as politics and literary criticism and more taken up with the display of good manners.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Speech Communication.; Theater.; Literature, English.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Canfield, J. Douglas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFrom the stage to the coffeehouse to the drawing room: Conversation in eighteenth-century Englanden_US
dc.creatorPrineas, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrineas, Sarahen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the history of conversation in eighteenth-century England by looking at normative sites of discourse, beginning with the comedies of the Restoration stage, moving on to the coffeehouses, the polite drawing rooms, and ending with an examination of the Bluestocking circle. Of particular interest is the role of women as conversation moves along a trajectory from the eloquence of the Renaissance period to a more rational style associated with the emerging middle class, to the polite conversation that allowed women a place in discourse. Early in the period, women were expected to remain silent--and thus chaste--when in company, but as the century progressed and it became clear that women's public roles were expanding, the mode of public discourse shifted, from eloquence to politeness. At the same time, the normative sites of discourse shifted as well, from the coffeehouse, in which the man aware of his civic duty engaged in rational debates on subjects of public import, to the more private drawing rooms, sites presided over by women and made polite by their presence. The conversation, as well, became less concerned with public issues such as politics and literary criticism and more taken up with the display of good manners.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
dc.subjectTheater.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, English.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCanfield, J. Douglasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3050357en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42728356en_US
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