Examining the impact of repeated exposure to ideal mediated body images on body satisfaction, self-esteem, and disordered eating in females

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279969
Title:
Examining the impact of repeated exposure to ideal mediated body images on body satisfaction, self-esteem, and disordered eating in females
Author:
Hendriks, Alexandra
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Based on principles related to the self-concept, social comparison theory, self-discrepancy theory, and cultivation theory, this study predicted that increases in exposure to mediated ideal bodies would be associated with a greater likelihood to hold beauty-related beliefs and values consistent with those presented in mainstream media. The study further predicted that, by altering the fidelity of the relationship between the ought self and the ideal self, individual difference variables (i.e., body mass index, self-monitoring, intrasexual competitiveness, and self-efficacy) would interact with media exposure to affect body satisfaction. Body satisfaction, in turn, would interact with importance of the physical self to the self-concept to affect self-esteem, which would predict patterns of disordered eating. To test these predictions, 202 undergraduate females completed a survey during class time. Results revealed that fashion magazine consumption (but not television consumption) was positively correlated with beauty-related beliefs. While media exposure did not directly predict body satisfaction, body mass and self-efficacy were direct predictors of body satisfaction. Self-monitoring interacted with body weight and fashion magazine consumption to influence body satisfaction, as did intrasexual competitiveness. Body satisfaction and self-esteem were positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with characteristics of eating disorders. The implications of these results, as well as suggestions for future research, are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Women's Studies.; Mass Communications.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burgoon, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExamining the impact of repeated exposure to ideal mediated body images on body satisfaction, self-esteem, and disordered eating in femalesen_US
dc.creatorHendriks, Alexandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorHendriks, Alexandraen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBased on principles related to the self-concept, social comparison theory, self-discrepancy theory, and cultivation theory, this study predicted that increases in exposure to mediated ideal bodies would be associated with a greater likelihood to hold beauty-related beliefs and values consistent with those presented in mainstream media. The study further predicted that, by altering the fidelity of the relationship between the ought self and the ideal self, individual difference variables (i.e., body mass index, self-monitoring, intrasexual competitiveness, and self-efficacy) would interact with media exposure to affect body satisfaction. Body satisfaction, in turn, would interact with importance of the physical self to the self-concept to affect self-esteem, which would predict patterns of disordered eating. To test these predictions, 202 undergraduate females completed a survey during class time. Results revealed that fashion magazine consumption (but not television consumption) was positively correlated with beauty-related beliefs. While media exposure did not directly predict body satisfaction, body mass and self-efficacy were direct predictors of body satisfaction. Self-monitoring interacted with body weight and fashion magazine consumption to influence body satisfaction, as did intrasexual competitiveness. Body satisfaction and self-esteem were positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with characteristics of eating disorders. The implications of these results, as well as suggestions for future research, are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurgoon, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3050331en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42727947en_US
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