Commitment in close romantic relationships: Correlates and processes associated with commitment phenomena

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279968
Title:
Commitment in close romantic relationships: Correlates and processes associated with commitment phenomena
Author:
Givertz, Michelle Dora
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study measured affective tone, conflict responses and outcomes, trust, cognitive interdependence, satisfaction, and personal and constraint commitment in dating, engaged, and married couples, as well as in a group of individuals who had recently broken up from a dating relationship. At the research laboratory, participants completed a brief graphing procedure of how their commitment to their relationship developed and changed over time, a self-report measure of conflict responses and outcomes, satisfaction, trust, and personal and constraint commitment, as well as participating in an Oral History Interview. Consistent with expectations, the three groups of intact couples differed significantly from the group of broken up individuals on all but one of the variables of interest. Comparison of the three groups of intact couples revealed that they were quite similar, however, there were differences in both personal and constraint commitment, with increases associated with more advanced relationship stages. As hypothesized, results of this study indicated that positive affective tone, positive conflict responses and outcomes, trust, cognitive interdependence, and satisfaction were positively associated with personal commitment, and that trust and interesting sex difference emerged from the findings, in that while trust was significantly predictive of both types of commitment for females, it was not predictive of either type of commitment for males. Additionally, post hoc analyses revealed that personal commitment mediated the relationship between satisfaction and constraint commitment.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Psychology, Social.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Segrin, Chris

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCommitment in close romantic relationships: Correlates and processes associated with commitment phenomenaen_US
dc.creatorGivertz, Michelle Doraen_US
dc.contributor.authorGivertz, Michelle Doraen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study measured affective tone, conflict responses and outcomes, trust, cognitive interdependence, satisfaction, and personal and constraint commitment in dating, engaged, and married couples, as well as in a group of individuals who had recently broken up from a dating relationship. At the research laboratory, participants completed a brief graphing procedure of how their commitment to their relationship developed and changed over time, a self-report measure of conflict responses and outcomes, satisfaction, trust, and personal and constraint commitment, as well as participating in an Oral History Interview. Consistent with expectations, the three groups of intact couples differed significantly from the group of broken up individuals on all but one of the variables of interest. Comparison of the three groups of intact couples revealed that they were quite similar, however, there were differences in both personal and constraint commitment, with increases associated with more advanced relationship stages. As hypothesized, results of this study indicated that positive affective tone, positive conflict responses and outcomes, trust, cognitive interdependence, and satisfaction were positively associated with personal commitment, and that trust and interesting sex difference emerged from the findings, in that while trust was significantly predictive of both types of commitment for females, it was not predictive of either type of commitment for males. Additionally, post hoc analyses revealed that personal commitment mediated the relationship between satisfaction and constraint commitment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSegrin, Chrisen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3050330en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42727923en_US
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