Evolution and function of complex signaling in spider courtship behavior

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279966
Title:
Evolution and function of complex signaling in spider courtship behavior
Author:
Hebets, Eileen Anne
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Complex signaling, while common throughout the animal kingdom, is poorly understood and generally understudied. This dissertation provides a framework from which one can approach studies of complex signal function. The semantics involved in studies of signal evolution and complex signaling are discussed and complex signaling is broken down into two categories: multiple signals and multimodal signals. While single signals ultimately reflect the pressures of both tactical and strategic design, so must complex signals. I explore hypotheses relating to the function of complex signaling in terms of both tactical and strategic design pressures and then explore hypotheses allowing for the possibility of inter-signal interactions. Predictions of some tactical design hypotheses of complex signaling suggest that multimodal signals can act independently, as back-ups to each other in the presence of environmental noise, or they can interact in a variety of ways. I tested the tactical back-up hypothesis, among others, using the bimodal signaling wolf spider Schizocosa uetzi. Results suggest that the signals are not independent and that there is an inter-signal interaction in which the vibratory signal redirects and focuses a female's attention to the visual signal. A comparative approach explored the tactical and strategic design components of multimodal signaling across three species of Schizocosa, one unimodal signaling species (S. avida, vibration only) and two bimodally signaling species (S. uetzi and S. stridulans). Signal non-independence was found for both bimodally signaling species but the pattern of inter-signal interaction differed between the species. Inter-population interactions between divergent populations that possess independent, derived traits can also be affected by inter-signal interactions. Results from an empirical study using two divergent populations of the jumping spider Habronattus pugillis in inter-populational reciprocal crosses were compared to predictions of different models of sexual selection. Our results show a xenophilic mating preference with one population of females mating more frequently with foreign males than local males, while the second population of females showed no such difference. While this pattern is inconsistent with Fisherian selection and does not completely fit the predictions of pure sensory exploitation, it is completely consistent with one pattern predicted from a process of antagonistic coevolution.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Entomology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Papaj, Daniel; Maddison, Wayne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEvolution and function of complex signaling in spider courtship behavioren_US
dc.creatorHebets, Eileen Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHebets, Eileen Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractComplex signaling, while common throughout the animal kingdom, is poorly understood and generally understudied. This dissertation provides a framework from which one can approach studies of complex signal function. The semantics involved in studies of signal evolution and complex signaling are discussed and complex signaling is broken down into two categories: multiple signals and multimodal signals. While single signals ultimately reflect the pressures of both tactical and strategic design, so must complex signals. I explore hypotheses relating to the function of complex signaling in terms of both tactical and strategic design pressures and then explore hypotheses allowing for the possibility of inter-signal interactions. Predictions of some tactical design hypotheses of complex signaling suggest that multimodal signals can act independently, as back-ups to each other in the presence of environmental noise, or they can interact in a variety of ways. I tested the tactical back-up hypothesis, among others, using the bimodal signaling wolf spider Schizocosa uetzi. Results suggest that the signals are not independent and that there is an inter-signal interaction in which the vibratory signal redirects and focuses a female's attention to the visual signal. A comparative approach explored the tactical and strategic design components of multimodal signaling across three species of Schizocosa, one unimodal signaling species (S. avida, vibration only) and two bimodally signaling species (S. uetzi and S. stridulans). Signal non-independence was found for both bimodally signaling species but the pattern of inter-signal interaction differed between the species. Inter-population interactions between divergent populations that possess independent, derived traits can also be affected by inter-signal interactions. Results from an empirical study using two divergent populations of the jumping spider Habronattus pugillis in inter-populational reciprocal crosses were compared to predictions of different models of sexual selection. Our results show a xenophilic mating preference with one population of females mating more frequently with foreign males than local males, while the second population of females showed no such difference. While this pattern is inconsistent with Fisherian selection and does not completely fit the predictions of pure sensory exploitation, it is completely consistent with one pattern predicted from a process of antagonistic coevolution.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPapaj, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMaddison, Wayneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3050328en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4272787xen_US
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