Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279944
Title:
Students' perceptions of Web-based distance learning courses
Author:
Ham, Marsha K.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate student satisfaction levels with their web-based learning experience. Study sites were three public Doctoral/Research Universities---Extensive. A cross-sectional, web-based survey collected data from students about their perceptions of satisfaction and success in the two months following completion of their spring 2001 courses. Two hundred sixty-nine (269) students enrolled in 40 graduate-level, web-based courses at the three sites were surveyed. Students were divided into two study groups: completers and non-completers. The survey for course completers covered five major topic areas: experience with computers and the Web, course participation, images of self, perceptions of satisfaction and success, and general information. The survey for non-completers covered two topic areas: general information and factors affecting decision to drop from the course. Hierarchical regressions revealed significant relationships between satisfaction and self-efficacy and between self-efficacy and interpersonal control at two sites (p̲ < .05 and p̲ < .001, respectively). Hierarchical regressions also revealed significant relationships between satisfaction and level of communication (p̲ < .01 and p̲ < .05, respectively). When limiting the definition of available technical support to instructor assistance or help from teaching assistants, there appeared to be a significant relationship between available technical support and students' overall success in their courses (p̲ < .05). Students' attitudes about the Web were positively correlated to both their overall satisfaction and success at one site (p̲ < .05) while at the second site attitudes toward the Web were positively correlated only to satisfaction with the course (p̲ < .05). No significant relationships were found between students' participation in collaborative learning activities and satisfaction. The study raises a number of questions related to the relationship of gender to student satisfaction and success and to the relationship of discipline to the structure of the web-based course. Future research can address these relationships to clarify the relationship between students' perceptions of satisfaction and success and the type of learning activities and experiences they encounter in web-based distance courses based on gender and field of study.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Technology of.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStudents' perceptions of Web-based distance learning coursesen_US
dc.creatorHam, Marsha K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHam, Marsha K.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate student satisfaction levels with their web-based learning experience. Study sites were three public Doctoral/Research Universities---Extensive. A cross-sectional, web-based survey collected data from students about their perceptions of satisfaction and success in the two months following completion of their spring 2001 courses. Two hundred sixty-nine (269) students enrolled in 40 graduate-level, web-based courses at the three sites were surveyed. Students were divided into two study groups: completers and non-completers. The survey for course completers covered five major topic areas: experience with computers and the Web, course participation, images of self, perceptions of satisfaction and success, and general information. The survey for non-completers covered two topic areas: general information and factors affecting decision to drop from the course. Hierarchical regressions revealed significant relationships between satisfaction and self-efficacy and between self-efficacy and interpersonal control at two sites (p̲ < .05 and p̲ < .001, respectively). Hierarchical regressions also revealed significant relationships between satisfaction and level of communication (p̲ < .01 and p̲ < .05, respectively). When limiting the definition of available technical support to instructor assistance or help from teaching assistants, there appeared to be a significant relationship between available technical support and students' overall success in their courses (p̲ < .05). Students' attitudes about the Web were positively correlated to both their overall satisfaction and success at one site (p̲ < .05) while at the second site attitudes toward the Web were positively correlated only to satisfaction with the course (p̲ < .05). No significant relationships were found between students' participation in collaborative learning activities and satisfaction. The study raises a number of questions related to the relationship of gender to student satisfaction and success and to the relationship of discipline to the structure of the web-based course. Future research can address these relationships to clarify the relationship between students' perceptions of satisfaction and success and the type of learning activities and experiences they encounter in web-based distance courses based on gender and field of study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Gary D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3050298en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42723760en_US
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