Evaluating the consequential aspect of validity on the Arizona Instrument to Measure Standards

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279924
Title:
Evaluating the consequential aspect of validity on the Arizona Instrument to Measure Standards
Author:
Doran, Harold Cass
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
High stakes tests have become a prominent tool in the systemic reform movement documenting the need for change and serving as the instrument of educational change. The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the positive consequences associated with high stakes test use and interpretation in Arizona were shared among all grade levels, not just the tested grades. Additionally, a curriculum alignment variable was examined to observe its association with curricular and instructional change. The AIMS Questionnaire was developed using principal components with varimax rotation and the Multitrait-Multimethod Matrix (Campbell & Fiske, 1959). The questionnaire was administered to elementary teachers using a Posttest-Only with Nonequivalent Groups quasi-experimental research design (Cook & Campbell, 1979) where teachers in the nontested grades (1, 2, and 4) served as the comparison group. A two-factor analysis of variance was performed to examine the primary hypothesis, and the Pearson Product Moment correlation was computed to observe the strength of the relationship between the curriculum alignment variable and the curricular/instructional change variable. Results of the analysis suggested that positive consequences were not equally shared among all grade levels in the elementary school. Additionally, the curriculum alignment variable accounted for less than 2% of the variance in the change variable. It is recommended that policymakers use a randomized testing model and select a new grade level and a new form of the test each year. Further, educational leaders should use curriculum alignment strategies with caution as they may be viewed as top-down change strategies that constrain a teacher's creativity. Future researchers should consider the use of predicted pattern testing (Levin & Neumann, 1999) to statistically examine the system-wide effects of a high-stakes assessment designed to impact student learning.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Tests and Measurements.; Education, Administration.; Education, Educational Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Leadership
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hendricks, J. Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEvaluating the consequential aspect of validity on the Arizona Instrument to Measure Standardsen_US
dc.creatorDoran, Harold Cassen_US
dc.contributor.authorDoran, Harold Cassen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHigh stakes tests have become a prominent tool in the systemic reform movement documenting the need for change and serving as the instrument of educational change. The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the positive consequences associated with high stakes test use and interpretation in Arizona were shared among all grade levels, not just the tested grades. Additionally, a curriculum alignment variable was examined to observe its association with curricular and instructional change. The AIMS Questionnaire was developed using principal components with varimax rotation and the Multitrait-Multimethod Matrix (Campbell & Fiske, 1959). The questionnaire was administered to elementary teachers using a Posttest-Only with Nonequivalent Groups quasi-experimental research design (Cook & Campbell, 1979) where teachers in the nontested grades (1, 2, and 4) served as the comparison group. A two-factor analysis of variance was performed to examine the primary hypothesis, and the Pearson Product Moment correlation was computed to observe the strength of the relationship between the curriculum alignment variable and the curricular/instructional change variable. Results of the analysis suggested that positive consequences were not equally shared among all grade levels in the elementary school. Additionally, the curriculum alignment variable accounted for less than 2% of the variance in the change variable. It is recommended that policymakers use a randomized testing model and select a new grade level and a new form of the test each year. Further, educational leaders should use curriculum alignment strategies with caution as they may be viewed as top-down change strategies that constrain a teacher's creativity. Future researchers should consider the use of predicted pattern testing (Levin & Neumann, 1999) to statistically examine the system-wide effects of a high-stakes assessment designed to impact student learning.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Tests and Measurements.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHendricks, J. Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest3040140en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42488576en_US
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