Morphotectonic investigation of the Arctic Alaska terrane: Implications to basement architecture, basin evolution, neotectonics and natural resource management

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279894
Title:
Morphotectonic investigation of the Arctic Alaska terrane: Implications to basement architecture, basin evolution, neotectonics and natural resource management
Author:
Casavant, Robert Ronald
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study created a new tectonic model for the Arctic Alaska terrane (AAT) by connecting attributes interpreted from surface and subsurface maps. Lineaments that cross the Brooks Range and North Slope proclaim the presence of basement fault blocks trending to the northeast that locally are aligned with streams, coast and lake shorelines, submarine canyons, and periglacial features. These landforms and anomalies reflect upward propagation of long-lived transcurrent and rift fault fabrics. Facies mapping and analysis of heat-flow effects on permafrost, and data from aeromagnetic, gravity and reflection seismic surveys, support the correlation of basement faulting with geomorphic patterns. The conjugate pattern of fault blocks, seen across Paleozoic- and Mesozoic-age passive margin sequences, resembles a piano keyboard and was inherited from older rift margin and transcurrent-transfer faults. Seismic data and North Slope oil-reservoir characteristics reveal complex fault-block boundaries, and common fault reactivation and structural inversion. The rigid North American craton in the Yukon Territory directs deformation westward leading to continued crustal indention, migration of basement blocks, and thrusting of cover rocks north of the Arctic oroclinal bend. Differential south-vergent underthrusting and uplift of the basement blocks of the North Slope plate has episodically segmented and partitioned strain across the overlying weaker north-vergent cover rocks of the North Alaskan plate. These tectonic controls have influenced the structural and geomorphic evolution of the North Slope-Brooks Range foothills region, including the formation of oil and gas reservoirs and mineral deposits.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geology.; Hydrology.; Engineering, Petroleum.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Earth sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Baker, Victor R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMorphotectonic investigation of the Arctic Alaska terrane: Implications to basement architecture, basin evolution, neotectonics and natural resource managementen_US
dc.creatorCasavant, Robert Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.authorCasavant, Robert Ronalden_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study created a new tectonic model for the Arctic Alaska terrane (AAT) by connecting attributes interpreted from surface and subsurface maps. Lineaments that cross the Brooks Range and North Slope proclaim the presence of basement fault blocks trending to the northeast that locally are aligned with streams, coast and lake shorelines, submarine canyons, and periglacial features. These landforms and anomalies reflect upward propagation of long-lived transcurrent and rift fault fabrics. Facies mapping and analysis of heat-flow effects on permafrost, and data from aeromagnetic, gravity and reflection seismic surveys, support the correlation of basement faulting with geomorphic patterns. The conjugate pattern of fault blocks, seen across Paleozoic- and Mesozoic-age passive margin sequences, resembles a piano keyboard and was inherited from older rift margin and transcurrent-transfer faults. Seismic data and North Slope oil-reservoir characteristics reveal complex fault-block boundaries, and common fault reactivation and structural inversion. The rigid North American craton in the Yukon Territory directs deformation westward leading to continued crustal indention, migration of basement blocks, and thrusting of cover rocks north of the Arctic oroclinal bend. Differential south-vergent underthrusting and uplift of the basement blocks of the North Slope plate has episodically segmented and partitioned strain across the overlying weaker north-vergent cover rocks of the North Alaskan plate. These tectonic controls have influenced the structural and geomorphic evolution of the North Slope-Brooks Range foothills region, including the formation of oil and gas reservoirs and mineral deposits.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeology.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Petroleum.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEarth sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBaker, Victor R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3031414en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42289397en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.