Athletic commodities: The African-American male student-athlete in higher education

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279889
Title:
Athletic commodities: The African-American male student-athlete in higher education
Author:
Berry, Ruben Dean
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Most of the focus and support given to student-athletes is during the time of eligibility. After the eligibility expires, some of these athletes disconnect themselves from the athletic department and become a mere memory of the past. The myriad of unique challenges facing former student-athletes who have not graduated or retired from sports are well documented. Dexter Manley of the Washington Redskins tearfully told a U.S. Senate panel on illiteracy that despite his four years at Oklahoma State University, he had neither graduated nor learned to read. Kevin Ross, former basketball player who did not graduate, complained on national TV talk shows that he had never learned to read in four years at Creighton University (Byers, 1995). To alleviate some of the problems, I decided to focus my study on the college experiences of African-American student-athletes to better understand the complexities that they encounter during and after their athletic scholarship. The long-term objective is to establish a service oriented, salubrious program for former student athletes once their eligibility expires along with their retirement from sport. After perusing a myriad of reports of the exploitation of student-athletes in the revenue producing sports, the research questions became: Are these accounts typical? Universal? Do most athletes experience exploitation and abuse? African-Americans more than other racial groups? How representative are these commentaries of the actual sports experiences of college sport participants? In this investigation I will focus on African-American college athletes' attitudes, opinions, experiences, and perceptions surrounding exploitation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Black Studies.; Education, Sociology of.; Education, Higher.; Recreation.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ruiz, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAthletic commodities: The African-American male student-athlete in higher educationen_US
dc.creatorBerry, Ruben Deanen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerry, Ruben Deanen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMost of the focus and support given to student-athletes is during the time of eligibility. After the eligibility expires, some of these athletes disconnect themselves from the athletic department and become a mere memory of the past. The myriad of unique challenges facing former student-athletes who have not graduated or retired from sports are well documented. Dexter Manley of the Washington Redskins tearfully told a U.S. Senate panel on illiteracy that despite his four years at Oklahoma State University, he had neither graduated nor learned to read. Kevin Ross, former basketball player who did not graduate, complained on national TV talk shows that he had never learned to read in four years at Creighton University (Byers, 1995). To alleviate some of the problems, I decided to focus my study on the college experiences of African-American student-athletes to better understand the complexities that they encounter during and after their athletic scholarship. The long-term objective is to establish a service oriented, salubrious program for former student athletes once their eligibility expires along with their retirement from sport. After perusing a myriad of reports of the exploitation of student-athletes in the revenue producing sports, the research questions became: Are these accounts typical? Universal? Do most athletes experience exploitation and abuse? African-Americans more than other racial groups? How representative are these commentaries of the actual sports experiences of college sport participants? In this investigation I will focus on African-American college athletes' attitudes, opinions, experiences, and perceptions surrounding exploitation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBlack Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Sociology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
dc.subjectRecreation.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest3031407en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42288770en_US
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