Family caregiving experience and health status among Chinese in the United States

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279876
Title:
Family caregiving experience and health status among Chinese in the United States
Author:
Hsueh, Kuei-Hsiang
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
It is estimated that by 2025 the Asian population in the United States will be over 40 million; it will represent nearly 10% of the total U.S. population. Currently Chinese immigrants are the largest Asian group and constitute 22.6% of all Asian immigrants. With the Chinese immigrant population growing steadily, the Chinese elderly population will increase in the future. Historically, "Hsiao" (filial piety in English), rooted in Confucianism, teaches Chinese people to pay respect to living parents and provides rules for culturally defined intergenerational relationships and family caregiving, and putting family needs above individual interests. Among the Chinese, family caregiving is perceived as a duty, obligation, responsibility, and cultural virtue. The purpose of the study was to test a theoretical model specifying how factors including subjective beliefs of traditional filial obligation, subjective feelings about role requirements, perceived burdens, perceived rewards and use of coping affect Chinese caregivers' health in the United States. The aim of this study was to understand how caregivers' cultural background and the appraisal of family caregiving affect caregivers' well-being. Data from 137 caregivers were used to describe sample profile and for model testing. The original model failed to explain the data adequately. Two revised models were developed. Results suggest that data fit better with physical health, as indicated by CFI = .91 and the χ²/df ratio = 2.9, than mental health model, as indicated by CFI = .90 and the χ²/df ratio = 3.5. Findings suggest caregivers' beliefs of traditional filial obligation is a primary predictor for caregivers' physical health. Caregivers' subjective beliefs of traditional filial obligation affect caregivers' physical health not only directly but also indirectly. Implications for nursing research, practice, education and theory construction, and policy making were addressed. Limitations and recommendations for research design and interpretation of model fit were described. Further studies are needed to compare differences in cultural influences among different ethnic groups, identify effective coping style and test the effect of intervention caregivers' health.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nursing.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Phillips, Linda R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFamily caregiving experience and health status among Chinese in the United Statesen_US
dc.creatorHsueh, Kuei-Hsiangen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsueh, Kuei-Hsiangen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIt is estimated that by 2025 the Asian population in the United States will be over 40 million; it will represent nearly 10% of the total U.S. population. Currently Chinese immigrants are the largest Asian group and constitute 22.6% of all Asian immigrants. With the Chinese immigrant population growing steadily, the Chinese elderly population will increase in the future. Historically, "Hsiao" (filial piety in English), rooted in Confucianism, teaches Chinese people to pay respect to living parents and provides rules for culturally defined intergenerational relationships and family caregiving, and putting family needs above individual interests. Among the Chinese, family caregiving is perceived as a duty, obligation, responsibility, and cultural virtue. The purpose of the study was to test a theoretical model specifying how factors including subjective beliefs of traditional filial obligation, subjective feelings about role requirements, perceived burdens, perceived rewards and use of coping affect Chinese caregivers' health in the United States. The aim of this study was to understand how caregivers' cultural background and the appraisal of family caregiving affect caregivers' well-being. Data from 137 caregivers were used to describe sample profile and for model testing. The original model failed to explain the data adequately. Two revised models were developed. Results suggest that data fit better with physical health, as indicated by CFI = .91 and the χ²/df ratio = 2.9, than mental health model, as indicated by CFI = .90 and the χ²/df ratio = 3.5. Findings suggest caregivers' beliefs of traditional filial obligation is a primary predictor for caregivers' physical health. Caregivers' subjective beliefs of traditional filial obligation affect caregivers' physical health not only directly but also indirectly. Implications for nursing research, practice, education and theory construction, and policy making were addressed. Limitations and recommendations for research design and interpretation of model fit were described. Further studies are needed to compare differences in cultural influences among different ethnic groups, identify effective coping style and test the effect of intervention caregivers' health.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPhillips, Linda R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3031388en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42286645en_US
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