Systems thinking: Teachers' emerging conceptions and implementation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279872
Title:
Systems thinking: Teachers' emerging conceptions and implementation
Author:
Benson, Tracy Anne
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A systems thinking approach to classroom instruction is a relatively new instructional method, and effects of this approach have not been comprehensively documented even though interest in this approach is growing rapidly. This study examines teachers, emerging conceptions and implementation of systems thinking as a instructional methodology. The investigation explores the challenge of developing a systems thinking orientation among educators. Findings are based on the learning experiences of four middle school teachers working in an urban Northwestern school setting. A case study, ethnographic approach was used to investigate the teachers' emerging conceptions and implementation of systems thinking in their classrooms. Data were derived from journal entries, interviews, observation and classroom artifacts. Findings suggested that teachers perceived systems thinking as a beneficial classroom methodology, yet evidence supporting the validity of this perception was insufficient. In addition, teachers viewed systems thinking as an important life-long orientation and incorporated this view in their teaching. The impact of professional development structures such as training, resources, coaching, planning time, outside assistance, and a collegial atmosphere was significant. It was evident that teachers involved with systems thinking developed and articulated theories about the effects of systems thinking on their students.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Teacher Training.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Leadership
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Good, Thomas L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSystems thinking: Teachers' emerging conceptions and implementationen_US
dc.creatorBenson, Tracy Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBenson, Tracy Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA systems thinking approach to classroom instruction is a relatively new instructional method, and effects of this approach have not been comprehensively documented even though interest in this approach is growing rapidly. This study examines teachers, emerging conceptions and implementation of systems thinking as a instructional methodology. The investigation explores the challenge of developing a systems thinking orientation among educators. Findings are based on the learning experiences of four middle school teachers working in an urban Northwestern school setting. A case study, ethnographic approach was used to investigate the teachers' emerging conceptions and implementation of systems thinking in their classrooms. Data were derived from journal entries, interviews, observation and classroom artifacts. Findings suggested that teachers perceived systems thinking as a beneficial classroom methodology, yet evidence supporting the validity of this perception was insufficient. In addition, teachers viewed systems thinking as an important life-long orientation and incorporated this view in their teaching. The impact of professional development structures such as training, resources, coaching, planning time, outside assistance, and a collegial atmosphere was significant. It was evident that teachers involved with systems thinking developed and articulated theories about the effects of systems thinking on their students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGood, Thomas L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3031384en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42286530en_US
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