Characterization and remediation of pathogen, solvent, and petroleum contaminated aquifers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279841
Title:
Characterization and remediation of pathogen, solvent, and petroleum contaminated aquifers
Author:
Blanford, William James
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This work contains the results of studies of three fluid projects that investigated aspects of groundwater contaminant transport and remediation. The first project performed at Hill Air Force Base in Utah evaluated the performance of a vertical water flushing system for the remediation of a multi-component non-aqueous phase liquid. This project also encompassed determining contaminant distribution through soil core analysis and partitioning tracer studies. The work determined that the limited aqueous solubility of the primary contaminants led to the lack of efficient removal by the vertical water flushing system. The second remediation test evaluated the performance of the solubility enhancing agent cyclodextrin in restoring the contaminated aquifer at Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, Arizona. The results concluded that this advanced remediation technique was efficient in removing trichloroethene. Further, the project demonstrated the ability to separate TCE from the extracted solution through treatment with an air-stripping system and re-inject it for another multiple flushing of the aquifer. Additional site assessment including determination of lithological and contaminant distribution through well-bore sampling and system optimization by conducting a series of vertical tracer studies. To evaluate the impact of groundwater chemistry and travel distances on the transport behavior of enteric virus, experiments were conducted in the unconfined aquifer at the USGS Cape Cod Research Site. Separate experiments examined the transport behavior of bromide (Br-) and the bacteriophage PRD-1 in the effluent plume and the shallower uncontaminated groundwater. Results indicated the vast majority of the bacteriophages were lost from solution upon injection. The results further showed that this initial loss occurred within the first meter for the uncontaminated zone, whereas it occurred over a 4-meter distance in the contaminated zone. The greater distance required for the contaminated zone to defect similar mass loss is attributed to anion-exchange competition by organic matter, phosphate, and other anions present in higher concentrations in the contaminated zone. The results of this study indicate that a small, but infectious fraction of viable virus particles can persist and travel significant distances in sedimentary aquifers, despite variability in water chemistry.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Engineering, Environmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology and Water Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brusseau, Mark L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCharacterization and remediation of pathogen, solvent, and petroleum contaminated aquifersen_US
dc.creatorBlanford, William Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlanford, William Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis work contains the results of studies of three fluid projects that investigated aspects of groundwater contaminant transport and remediation. The first project performed at Hill Air Force Base in Utah evaluated the performance of a vertical water flushing system for the remediation of a multi-component non-aqueous phase liquid. This project also encompassed determining contaminant distribution through soil core analysis and partitioning tracer studies. The work determined that the limited aqueous solubility of the primary contaminants led to the lack of efficient removal by the vertical water flushing system. The second remediation test evaluated the performance of the solubility enhancing agent cyclodextrin in restoring the contaminated aquifer at Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, Arizona. The results concluded that this advanced remediation technique was efficient in removing trichloroethene. Further, the project demonstrated the ability to separate TCE from the extracted solution through treatment with an air-stripping system and re-inject it for another multiple flushing of the aquifer. Additional site assessment including determination of lithological and contaminant distribution through well-bore sampling and system optimization by conducting a series of vertical tracer studies. To evaluate the impact of groundwater chemistry and travel distances on the transport behavior of enteric virus, experiments were conducted in the unconfined aquifer at the USGS Cape Cod Research Site. Separate experiments examined the transport behavior of bromide (Br-) and the bacteriophage PRD-1 in the effluent plume and the shallower uncontaminated groundwater. Results indicated the vast majority of the bacteriophages were lost from solution upon injection. The results further showed that this initial loss occurred within the first meter for the uncontaminated zone, whereas it occurred over a 4-meter distance in the contaminated zone. The greater distance required for the contaminated zone to defect similar mass loss is attributed to anion-exchange competition by organic matter, phosphate, and other anions present in higher concentrations in the contaminated zone. The results of this study indicate that a small, but infectious fraction of viable virus particles can persist and travel significant distances in sedimentary aquifers, despite variability in water chemistry.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Environmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrusseau, Mark L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3026582en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42179919en_US
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