Detailed study of the Yarkovsky effect on asteroids and solar system implications

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279835
Title:
Detailed study of the Yarkovsky effect on asteroids and solar system implications
Author:
Spitale, Joseph Nicholas
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Yarkovsky effect is a change in a body's orbit caused by its reaction to the momentum carried away by the thermal photons that it emits. This effect may play a key role in the orbital evolution of asteroids and near-Earth objects. To evaluate the Yarkovsky acceleration under a wide range of conditions, I have developed a three-dimensional finite-difference solution to the heat equation. This approach employs neither the linearized boundary conditions, the plane-parallel heat flow approximation, nor the assumption of fast rotation used in earlier approaches (Rubincam, 1998; Vokrouhlickỳ and Farinella, 1998). Thus it can be used to explore a wide range of orbital elements and physical properties that had not been previously accessible. I use the finite-difference approach to compute Yarkovsky perturbations for homogeneous, spherical stony bodies with 1-, 10- and 100-m diameters. For a 1-m scale body rotating with a 5-h period, the semimajor axis can change as much as 1 AU in 1 Myr and the eccentricity can change as much as 0.1 in 1 Myr. These rates are much faster than any found previously because those treatments were not valid for very eccentric orbits. For rotation periods expected to be more typical of such small bodies, these rates would be considerably slower. Nevertheless, there is no data concerning rotation rates for small bodies so these fast rates may be relevant. Yarkovsky drift rates are computed for models of specific near-Earth asteroids, demonstrating that the shape of a body is important in computing its precise Yarkovsky effect. Such calculations may be useful for assessing observable Yarkovsky perturbations and in predicting and mitigating NEA hazards. The approach presented in this dissertation is the only current one with the potential to rigorously treat bodies with arbitrary shapes.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Astronomy and Astrophysics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Planetary Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Greenberg, Richard J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDetailed study of the Yarkovsky effect on asteroids and solar system implicationsen_US
dc.creatorSpitale, Joseph Nicholasen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpitale, Joseph Nicholasen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Yarkovsky effect is a change in a body's orbit caused by its reaction to the momentum carried away by the thermal photons that it emits. This effect may play a key role in the orbital evolution of asteroids and near-Earth objects. To evaluate the Yarkovsky acceleration under a wide range of conditions, I have developed a three-dimensional finite-difference solution to the heat equation. This approach employs neither the linearized boundary conditions, the plane-parallel heat flow approximation, nor the assumption of fast rotation used in earlier approaches (Rubincam, 1998; Vokrouhlickỳ and Farinella, 1998). Thus it can be used to explore a wide range of orbital elements and physical properties that had not been previously accessible. I use the finite-difference approach to compute Yarkovsky perturbations for homogeneous, spherical stony bodies with 1-, 10- and 100-m diameters. For a 1-m scale body rotating with a 5-h period, the semimajor axis can change as much as 1 AU in 1 Myr and the eccentricity can change as much as 0.1 in 1 Myr. These rates are much faster than any found previously because those treatments were not valid for very eccentric orbits. For rotation periods expected to be more typical of such small bodies, these rates would be considerably slower. Nevertheless, there is no data concerning rotation rates for small bodies so these fast rates may be relevant. Yarkovsky drift rates are computed for models of specific near-Earth asteroids, demonstrating that the shape of a body is important in computing its precise Yarkovsky effect. Such calculations may be useful for assessing observable Yarkovsky perturbations and in predicting and mitigating NEA hazards. The approach presented in this dissertation is the only current one with the potential to rigorously treat bodies with arbitrary shapes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Astronomy and Astrophysics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlanetary Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGreenberg, Richard J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3026568en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42177571en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.