Characterization of semiconductor devices through scanned probe microscopies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279833
Title:
Characterization of semiconductor devices through scanned probe microscopies
Author:
Peterson, Charles A.
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Modern ULSI technology is currently pushing the limits of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (MOSFET) gate dielectric stability by requiring thicknesses on the order of only a few tens of angstroms. At this thickness, even small levels of contamination may lead to undesirable or fatal device characteristics. Common techniques for detecting the effects of contaminants on MOSFET devices use, for example, gate oxide integrity (GOI) and capacitance vs. voltage (C-V) curves methods. Such methods, however, lack the spatial resolution required to characterize the effects of an isolated contaminant. Imaging techniques with high lateral resolution such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Capacitance Microscopy (SCM) offer some information about both the local presence and effect of contaminating materials. Additionally, a new technique called Tunneling Atomic Force Microscopy (TAFM) has been developed to locally map and characterize the electric properties of thin oxides in order to study how contaminants interact with the oxide. This technique uses an AFM with a conducting tip to place a localized tip-sample bias across the oxide, causing quantum mechanical electron tunneling. The TAFM can be used in a constant current or constant voltage mode, yielding complementary information about the local electronic properties of the features in the oxide film. Also, by fixing the position of the tip above the feature and ramping the bias, one obtains an I-V curve that can be analyzed using metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) theory. An analysis of the AFM map, TAFM map, and I-V curves helps one to determine the nature of the bulge.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Electronics and Electrical.; Physics, Condensed Matter.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Physics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sarid, Dror; Manne, Srin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCharacterization of semiconductor devices through scanned probe microscopiesen_US
dc.creatorPeterson, Charles A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Charles A.en_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractModern ULSI technology is currently pushing the limits of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (MOSFET) gate dielectric stability by requiring thicknesses on the order of only a few tens of angstroms. At this thickness, even small levels of contamination may lead to undesirable or fatal device characteristics. Common techniques for detecting the effects of contaminants on MOSFET devices use, for example, gate oxide integrity (GOI) and capacitance vs. voltage (C-V) curves methods. Such methods, however, lack the spatial resolution required to characterize the effects of an isolated contaminant. Imaging techniques with high lateral resolution such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Capacitance Microscopy (SCM) offer some information about both the local presence and effect of contaminating materials. Additionally, a new technique called Tunneling Atomic Force Microscopy (TAFM) has been developed to locally map and characterize the electric properties of thin oxides in order to study how contaminants interact with the oxide. This technique uses an AFM with a conducting tip to place a localized tip-sample bias across the oxide, causing quantum mechanical electron tunneling. The TAFM can be used in a constant current or constant voltage mode, yielding complementary information about the local electronic properties of the features in the oxide film. Also, by fixing the position of the tip above the feature and ramping the bias, one obtains an I-V curve that can be analyzed using metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) theory. An analysis of the AFM map, TAFM map, and I-V curves helps one to determine the nature of the bulge.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Condensed Matter.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSarid, Droren_US
dc.contributor.advisorManne, Srinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3026565en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42177534en_US
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