Superfluous absence: The secret life of the author in twentieth-century literature and film

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/279822
Title:
Superfluous absence: The secret life of the author in twentieth-century literature and film
Author:
Cottle, Brent
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Superfluous Absence examines how writers of fictional narratives imagine readers that might read their texts and use these imagined readers--and the voices they represent--as leavening agents for the fictions they produce. In this theory, writers do not appeal to these readers except as they function as language and its desire to be decoded--as they function as language's desire for itself. Ultimately, the texts of fiction reach real-life readers and Superfluous Absence traces how authors struggle with the leavening agent of the reader's voice when the reader's voice becomes an actual social presence in an actual historical moment. This struggle consists of writers trying to preserve a non-space, and readers try to turn this non-space into praxis and presence. In Superfluous Absence I trace this struggle in James Joyce's Finnegan's Wake, Samuel Beckett's trilogy of Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable and Stephen King's Misery . I also explore what happens to this reading desire when it is translated into a visual format, as is so often the case in the twentieth-century when literature is adapted into film. The test case is Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, an appropriate choice as it is a movie that tries to eradicate the linguistic in favor of the purely visual. Finally, this project is not just an objective charting of the various locations and non-locations of the writer's voice in twentieth-century fiction and film, but is also a very subjective attempt on the part of this writer to understand the presence or non-presence of his authorial voice in acts of fiction. Therefore, the author of this dissertation frequently writes autobiographically and frequently turns his critical voice into the voice of fictional narration.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Literature, Modern.; Literature, American.; Literature, English.; Cinema.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nathanson, Tenney

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSuperfluous absence: The secret life of the author in twentieth-century literature and filmen_US
dc.creatorCottle, Brenten_US
dc.contributor.authorCottle, Brenten_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSuperfluous Absence examines how writers of fictional narratives imagine readers that might read their texts and use these imagined readers--and the voices they represent--as leavening agents for the fictions they produce. In this theory, writers do not appeal to these readers except as they function as language and its desire to be decoded--as they function as language's desire for itself. Ultimately, the texts of fiction reach real-life readers and Superfluous Absence traces how authors struggle with the leavening agent of the reader's voice when the reader's voice becomes an actual social presence in an actual historical moment. This struggle consists of writers trying to preserve a non-space, and readers try to turn this non-space into praxis and presence. In Superfluous Absence I trace this struggle in James Joyce's Finnegan's Wake, Samuel Beckett's trilogy of Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable and Stephen King's Misery . I also explore what happens to this reading desire when it is translated into a visual format, as is so often the case in the twentieth-century when literature is adapted into film. The test case is Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, an appropriate choice as it is a movie that tries to eradicate the linguistic in favor of the purely visual. Finally, this project is not just an objective charting of the various locations and non-locations of the writer's voice in twentieth-century fiction and film, but is also a very subjective attempt on the part of this writer to understand the presence or non-presence of his authorial voice in acts of fiction. Therefore, the author of this dissertation frequently writes autobiographically and frequently turns his critical voice into the voice of fictional narration.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, Modern.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, American.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, English.en_US
dc.subjectCinema.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNathanson, Tenneyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3023533en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41958032en_US
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